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Informatics at the University of Grenoble

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129651D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 4 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

JEAN KUNTZMANN: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes the development of applied mathematics and computer sciences at the University of Grenoble, beginning around 1948. It reviews the different teaching and research orientations as well as the computing equipment, which made Grenoble one of the first French center in this field.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1990 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Informatics at the University of Grenoble

JEAN KUNTZMANN

(Image Omitted: Author's address: Jean Kuntzmann, Residence Lucien Pellat 216, Monbonnot, 38330 Saint-Ismier, France.)

This article describes the development of applied mathematics and computer sciences at the University of Grenoble, beginning around 1948. It reviews the different teaching and research orientations as well as the computing equipment, which made Grenoble one of the first French center in this field.

Categories and Subject Descriptors: K2 [Computing Milieux]: History of Computing -- people, systems. K3.2 [Computing Milieux]: Computers and Education -- computer and information science education.

General Terms: Grenoble, University, IMAG, France, SEA.

Additional Terms: Applied mathematics, Computer, Education, Bolliet, Kuntzmann.

In 1945, I arrived in Grenoble to take up my duties as lecturer in the department of mathematics (Figure 1). The university was making a comeback, and so was I. M. Esclangon, professor of physics at the university and director of the Institut Polytechnique in Grenoble wanted to breathe new life into the teaching of mathematics in the school. He asked for volunteers and I volunteered for teaching in a special "High frequencies" section.

But Esclangon was not limiting himself to internal pedagogical problems; he started making university-industry contacts. He put me in touch with engineers who had problems to solve, and these concrete problems very quickly led me to ask some theoretical questions, that is, to get into research. My first paper was written in 1947, in a field that would come to be known as numerical analysis. When my first publication for industrial use came out, dated 1950, I embarked on the triple mission that characterizes higher education: teaching -- research -- external contacts.

My career could have been limited to a personal commitment; it was not, because of two phenomena that were unique to those times. The first was a spurt in the development of the universities. The 1950s were the scene of explosion in the growth of universities throughout France, not just in Grenoble. But here are a few figures on Grenoble:

1945: the Department of Sciences consisted of 15 professors, three of whom were mathematicians; there were no teaching assistants.

1955: there were 31 professors and lecturers, of whom six were mathematicians; 36 chefs de travaux11 of whom one was a mathematician; 21 TAs, of whom four were mathematicians.

1965: there were 93 professors and lecturers, of whom 17 were mathematicians; 339 chefs de trauaux, of whom 52 were mathematicians; and 65 TAs, of whom 12 were mathematicians.

1 1 A Chef de travaux holds an intermediate rank between an assistant and a full professor.

IEEE Computer Society, Mar 31, 1990 Page 1 IEEE Annals of the History o...