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Comments, Queries, and Debate: O. AFIPS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129698D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Herb Grosch: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

37 rue du Village 1295 Mies, Switzerland its peak requiring two sets of thick two-volume proceedings a year -- cost the earth, limited the choice of venues to horror spots like Atlantic City, and annoyed the powerful commercial exhibitors. Exhibit income dropped off. In 1971 AFIPS organized an advisory panel of industry types, chaired by Bob Forest, the editor of Datamation. It recommended cutting back to one Joint National Computer Conference a year. Growth resumed, but the shadows of poor volunteer objectives and amateurish financial management never entirely lifted. When I was president of ACM from 1976 to 1978 and again a member of the AFIPS board, I recommended over and over to the ACM council that we withdraw from AFIPS and give up the seductive NCC income.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 67% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1992 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Comments, Queries, and Debate: O. AFIPS!

Herb Grosch

37 rue du Village 1295 Mies, Switzerland its peak requiring two sets of thick two-volume proceedings a year -- cost the earth, limited the choice of venues to horror spots like Atlantic City, and annoyed the powerful commercial exhibitors.

Exhibit income dropped off. In 1971 AFIPS organized an advisory panel of industry types, chaired by Bob Forest, the editor of Datamation. It recommended cutting back to one Joint National Computer Conference a year. Growth resumed, but the shadows of poor volunteer objectives and amateurish financial management never entirely lifted. When I was president of ACM from 1976 to 1978 and again a member of the AFIPS board, I recommended over and over to the ACM council that we withdraw from AFIPS and give up the seductive NCC income.

Successor ACM presidents, notably Dave Brandon and Adele Goldberg, were equally appalled at AFIPS governance, but it was not until 1990 that ACM finally withdrew. Not at all coincidentally, the big annual financial bonanza -- and the NCCs themselves -- had disappeared.

Looking back I'm sure the basic problem was not the changing nature of computers, not the aroma of ready money, not even the private and professional ambitions of 4 horde of second- rate officeholders, but the fact th...