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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 14 Number 1 -- Happenings

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129712D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 17K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

JUDY O'NEILL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The Happenings department reports on past, present, and future events that are of interest to the history of computing. These events include conferences, appropriate sessions from meetings, exhibits, projects, awards, publications, collections, general memorabilia, and important dates in the history of computing. Contributions to the department are encouraged and should consist of a description or report of the event, highlighting its specific relevance.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1992 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Happenings

JUDY O'NEILL, EDITOR

The Happenings department reports on past, present, and future events that are of interest to the history of computing. These events include conferences, appropriate sessions from meetings, exhibits, projects, awards, publications, collections, general memorabilia, and important dates in the history of computing. Contributions to the department are encouraged and should consist of a description or report of the event, highlighting its specific relevance.

National Medal of Technology Awarded to Bell, Cocke, and Hopper

Three distinguished contributors to computing were among the 15 recipients of the National Medal of Technology in 1991. The medal recognizes scientists, engineers, and companies for contributions that improve the well-being of the United States through technological innovation and commercialization, and for contributions to improving the nation's technological work force. The National Medal of Technology is the highest honor bestowed for technological achievement.

(Image Omitted: C Gordon Bell receiving the National Medal of Technology.)

(Image Omitted: John Cocke receiving the National Medal of Technology.)

C. Gordon Bell received the medal in the category Product and Process Innovation, being cited "For his continuing intellectual and industrial achievements in the field of computer design; and for his leading role in establishing cost-effective, powerful computers which serve as a significant tool for engineering, science and industry." From 1960 to 1966 Bell worked at Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) as manager of computer design. He then taught at Carnegie Mellon University from 1966 to 1972. Returning to DEC in 1972, Bell was vice president for research and development, a position he held until 1981 when he founded Encore Computer Corporation. Bell helped to establish the National Science Foundation's Directorate for Computer Information Science and Engineering in 1986 and 1987 and served as its assistant director. In 1987 he was one of the founders of the Ardent Computer Corporation.

John Cocke was also awarded the medal of technology for Product and Process Innovation, being cited "For his development and implementation of Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) architecture that significantly increased the speed and efficiency of computers, thereby enhancing U.S. technological competitiveness." Cocke joined IBM in 1956 and is currently a fellow at the Thomas J. Watson Research Center. He led the development of RISC architecture at IBM. During his career, Cocke worked on optimizing compilers for IBM, developing algorithms for code elimination, program control, flow analysis, and partial execution. Cocke has also made contributions to magnetic recording, data compaction, error control, and coding theory.

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