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Requirements for End-to-Middle Security for the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) (RFC4189)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129732D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-07
Document File: 13 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

K. Ono: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) User Agent (UA) does not always trust all intermediaries in its request path to inspect its message bodies and/or headers contained in its message. The UA might want to protect the message bodies and/or headers from intermediaries, except those that provide services based on its content. This situation requires a mechanism called "end-to-middle security" to secure the information passed between the UA and intermediaries, which does not interfere with end-to-end security. This document defines a set of requirements for a mechanism to achieve end-to-middle security.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 11% of the total text.

Network Working Group                                             K. Ono
Request for Comments: 4189                                  S. Tachimoto
Category: Informational                                  NTT Corporation
                                                            October 2005


              Requirements for End-to-Middle Security for
                 the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)

Status of This Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
   memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2005).

Abstract

   A Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) User Agent (UA) does not always
   trust all intermediaries in its request path to inspect its message
   bodies and/or headers contained in its message.  The UA might want to
   protect the message bodies and/or headers from intermediaries, except
   those that provide services based on its content.  This situation
   requires a mechanism called "end-to-middle security" to secure the
   information passed between the UA and intermediaries, which does not
   interfere with end-to-end security.  This document defines a set of
   requirements for a mechanism to achieve end-to-middle security.

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction ....................................................2
      1.1. Conventions Used in This Document ..........................2
   2. Use Cases .......................................................2
      2.1. Examples of Scenarios ......................................2
      2.2. Service Examples ...........................................4
   3. Scope of End-to-Middle Security .................................6
   4. Requirements for a Solution .....................................6
      4.1. General Requirements .......................................6
      4.2. Requirements for End-to-Middle Confidentiality .............7
      4.3. Requirements for End-to-Middle Integrity ...................7
   5. Security Considerations .........................................8
   6. Acknowledgments .................................................9
   7. References ......................................................9
      7.1. Normative References .......................................9
      7.2. Informative References .....................................9

Ono & Tachimoto              Informational                      [Page 1]
RFC 4189          End-to-Middle Security Requirements       October 2005


1.  Introduction

   The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) [2] supports hop-by-hop
   security using Tr...