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Comments, Queries, and Debate: Time-Sharing at MIT (Correction)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129751D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Robert F. Rosin: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A minor error occurs on page 19 of the Annals of the History of Computing (Vol. 14, No. 1), where the first complete paragraph begins: ";In 1956, IBM provided an IBM 704 to be located at MIT..."; As a student in computer courses at MIT during the l956-57 academic year, I was introduced to computing, in part, through a set of notes Fernando Corbat6 had compiled on programming the IBM 704. Sadly, the machine was not available for use until after I left the Institute in June of 1957. Indeed, I recall that one of the delays in making it available was that the room in which it was to be housed was still under construction that spring.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1992 by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Inc. Used with permission.

Comments, Queries, and Debate: Time-Sharing at MIT (Correction)

Robert F. Rosin

Enhanced Service Providers, Inc. 39 Avenue of the Common Shrewsbury, NJ 07702 USA

A minor error occurs on page 19 of the Annals of the History of Computing (Vol. 14, No. 1), where the first complete paragraph begins: "In 1956, IBM provided an IBM 704 to be located at MIT..." As a student in computer courses at MIT during the l956-57 academic year, I was introduced to computing, in part, through a set of notes Fernando Corbat6 had compiled on programming the IBM 704. Sadly, the machine was not available for use until after I left the Institute in June of 1957. Indeed, I recall that one of the delays in making it available was that the room in which it was to be housed was still under construction that spring.

My best recollection is that the system was installed and dedicated in the fall of 1957. One of its first applications was tracking the first Sputnik launch.

Editor's note: Corbato has confirmed the 1957 date. IBM had approved the location of an IBM 704 at MIT in 1956, but it was not delivered until a year later. He notes that the Sputnik launch was on October 4, 1957.

IEEE Computer Society, Sep 30, 1992 Page 1 IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 14 Number 3, Page 8