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Biographies: Obituary - Johanna Piesch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129789D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Heinz Zemanek: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

PO Box 251 A-1011 Vienna Austria Johanna Piesch, Austrian switching algebra pioneer, died in Vienna on September 28, 1992. She was 94. Born in June 1898 in Innsbruck, Austria, Hansi, as she was known, studied physics at the University of Vienna and on graduation joined the Austrian PTT, the Postal Telephone and Telegraph service. Her first publications on switching algebra1,2 were written in 1938 in Berlin, where she had been moved by the German administration following the Anschluss in March. In the second paper of the pair she proposed a simplification method of her own. These papers established her as one of the earliest authors on this subject, a position which is internationally recognized.

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Copyright ©; 1993 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

Biographies: Obituary - Johanna Piesch

Heinz Zemanek

PO Box 251 A-1011 Vienna Austria

Johanna Piesch, Austrian switching algebra pioneer, died in Vienna on September 28, 1992. She was 94.

Born in June 1898 in Innsbruck, Austria, Hansi, as she was known, studied physics at the University of Vienna and on graduation joined the Austrian PTT, the Postal Telephone and Telegraph service. Her first publications on switching algebra1,2 were written in 1938 in Berlin, where she had been moved by the German administration following the Anschluss in March. In the second paper of the pair she proposed a simplification method of her own. These papers established her as one of the earliest authors on this subject, a position which is internationally recognized.

Three more papers followed after the war.3-5 Finally, in 1958, she wrote with H. Sequenz, then head of the Vienna University of Technology, about the Austrian forerunners and pioneers of switching algebra (e.g., R. Lischke, R. Edler, and E. Winkel; A. Ritter, O. Plechl, and A. Duschek).6 Her place in switching algebra history is after Shannon, Nakasima, and Hanzawa, referenced in her first paper, but before any Russians who often rely on her writings.

She was never loud and never published or even talked about herself. After her retire...