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Biographies: Obituary -- Edward Arthur Newman

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129869D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-07
Document File: 4 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Donald Watts Davies: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Edward Arthur Newman, a pioneer in radar, television, and computers, who led early research in pattern recognition and promoted UK government data processing, died 7 August, 1993, in Addlestone, Surrey, UK. He was 75. Born 27 April, 1918, in Walthamstow, London, Newman graduated in physics at University College, London University. After some postgraduate research and a short period at Masteradio, he joined the research laboratories of EMI (Electrical and Musical Industries -- a large UK corporation) to work on radar, which was a vital wartime technology for Britain, then under air attack. Microwave power sources, developed at Birmingham University, had revolutionized radar's scope, but novel systems and circuits were needed to exploit the new possibilities. The lead of EMI in this work came from its unique electronics experience in developing the hardware for the prewar television service of the BBC. Newman joined the team working with A.D. Blumlein, a true genius of electronics. [Figure containing following caption omitted: Edward Arthur Newman

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1995 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

Biographies: Obituary -- Edward Arthur Newman

Donald Watts Davies

Edward Arthur Newman, a pioneer in radar, television, and computers, who led early research in pattern recognition and promoted UK government data processing, died 7 August, 1993, in Addlestone, Surrey, UK. He was 75.

Born 27 April, 1918, in Walthamstow, London, Newman graduated in physics at University College, London University. After some postgraduate research and a short period at Masteradio, he joined the research laboratories of EMI (Electrical and Musical Industries -- a large UK corporation) to work on radar, which was a vital wartime technology for Britain, then under air attack. Microwave power sources, developed at Birmingham University, had revolutionized radar's scope, but novel systems and circuits were needed to exploit the new possibilities. The lead of EMI in this work came from its unique electronics experience in developing the hardware for the prewar television service of the BBC. Newman joined the team working with A.D. Blumlein, a true genius of electronics.

(Image Omitted: Edward Arthur Newman Born April 27, 1918, Walthamstow, London, UK. Died August 7, 1993, Addlestone, Surrey, UK. Circuit designer for the ACE computer and contributor to its logic design, early researcher in pattern and speech recognition, and influential promoter of government data processing in the UK. Education: BSc, physics, University College, London,

  1938. Professional experience: Masteradio, radio circuit design, 1939-1941; EMI Research Laboratories, radar design, 1941-1947; National Physical Laboratory, electronic circuit design, computer design, manager, 1947- 1977.)

The radar on which he worked was H2S, an airborne radar with a map-like display, the first of its kind. Newman was a long-distance runner and had gained his college colors for athletics as a member of the cross-country team. He was noted for cycling the 100 miles or so to Worcestershire where the test flights were carried out. On one of these flights, Blumlein and some of his colleagues were killed in a crash.

When the war ended. EMI resumed the development of television, using its wartime experience with faster and better pulse circuits. Newman developed advat1ced circuits for TV cameras which served BBC for many years. Colleagues of those years remember seeking his advice on circuit desiun1 and that he was noted for his lateral thinking.

Many wartime projects had needed large calculations, but research into numerical computation methods and expertise in this subject were patchy. As the war ended, the government established a special unit to develop numerical methods and. perhaps, to use electronic computation, which was then no more than a hope for the future. The chosen place for this research unit was the National P...