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First Hopper Celebration an Unqualified Success1

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000129949D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Sep-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

ANITA BORG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The first Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing was an unqualified success. This technical conference, held in Washington, D.C., June 9-11, 1995, honored computing pioneer Grace Murray Hopper and celebrated the contributions and successes of women in computing.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Copyright ©; 1996 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

First Hopper Celebration an Unqualified Success11

ANITA BORG

ANITA BORG

Introduction

The first Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing was an unqualified success. This technical conference, held in Washington, D.C., June 9-11, 1995, honored computing pioneer Grace Murray Hopper and celebrated the contributions and successes of women in computing.

The conference was sponsored by the Computing Research Association (CRA), the Association for Computing Machinery, and the IEEE Computer Society. Many corporations and government agencies provided financial support.

More than 450 people attended, 50 more than the planned maximum. At least 100 people had to be fumed away. The vast majority of the attendees were female, although attendance by men was not restricted. Those men who did attend (give Bill Wulf a call) found it every bit as exciting.

Every session was well-attended. The most common complaints were that the schedule was too full and people were tired after having attended all of the events.

About one-third of the attendees were students. The National Science Foundation and the Intel Foundation, with support from the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, funded scholarships and travel grants that made this level of student attendance possible.

The conference began with two days of plenary sessions featuring an array of top technical speakers and two panel discussions. Many attendees said they thought this was the best technical conference they had ever attended. As a seasoned conference attendee, though an admittedly biased one, I completely agree. While the talks were of the highest quality, the speakers also made it clear that they love what they do and do it well -- in part because of their enthusiasm. Many of the students attending the conference found this encouraging and motivating.

Panel discussions on the second day discussed significant policy issues of interest to the computing community and the option of moving from a technical career into management and ultimately into the executive suite.

Digital Equipment Corp., in addition to giving me the time to organize this event, gave a generous grant to fund the gala banquet. The banquet speaker, Mildred Dresselhaus, who has broken many barriers and achieved many firsts for women in physics, made it quite clear that computer science is not the only field where women have made great -- but all too frequently invisible -- contributions.

1 1. Reprinted, with permission, Computing Research News, Sept. 1994.

IEEE Computer Society, Sep 30, 1996 Page 1 IEEE Annals of the History of Computing Volume 18 Number 3, Pages 54-55

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First Hopper Celebration an Unqualified Success1

Microsoft Corp. sponsored a reception at the National Museum of Women in the Arts and gave a demons...