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Key to Autonomics: Common Message System Architecture and Methods enabling Autonomic Computing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130120D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Oct-12
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The general problem solved is enabling inter- & intra- system communication in a standard extensible format. Existing quasi-standards focus on data exchange formats useful only to the subset of systems they for which they are designed, reducing scalability and easy/efficiency of data mining for example. A key application of the present invention is autonomic problem determination (PD), analysis, and resolution, disclosed separately. Another abstract problem statement is that complex systems (or solutions) are executing, and may “know” what their state of health is, but they lack the ability or infrastructure to express their health to a more “omnipotent” observer. Disclosed is a numeric vector- (or matrix-) based architecture which allows a thought to be mapped against a common extensible dictionary. The "thought" is temporally what a system or device state is, and ideally needs to be expressed in a universally understood manner, thereby allowing an omnipotent observer the ability to interact and autonomically guide the future system direction. In other words, use an extensible data structure vector to numerically map the meaning of any information flow to an extensible master-dictionary.

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Key to Autonomics: Common Message System Architecture and Methods enabling Autonomic Computing

     The architecture needed is an extensible method for standardized messages to be generated that capture "Who said What about Whom, When, Where, and Why" at a minimum. The information represented must essentially map a language dictionary into some standard numeric-based message format. Pattern-recognition, artificial intelligence (AI), neural-network, etc., techniques could then be implemented at a variety of observation levels and system types (i.e., hardware platforms, firmware subsystems, OS, software applications, network fabric layers).

     The diagram below expresses a High Level Design, followed by a list of sample embodiments of the components.

§System is generic, i.e.: - Firmware - Software, including drivers - Business Solution applications - Operating System - Knowledge Bases, existing Customer Support DB's §All components may be local, remote, or both

    - Customer or IBM site §What's in the Dictionary?

- An index of [1:N entries] corresponding to:

    * Numbers & characters - Ie, the ASCII subset

* Letters of alphabet, multilingual
* Objects, words of spoken & machine language §d = subset of Dictionary

 Omnipotent Observer (PD Detection & Analysis)

 Omnipotent Observer (PD Detection & Analysis)

System

System

System

Dictionary

Dictionary

Transporter

Transporter

Transporter

d

d

d

Local Observer

Local Observer

Local Observer

Local Observer Translator

Local Observer Translator

Local Observer Translator

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         * Small for embedded systems or others where size limits are restricted A variety of standards exist in the computer field, but are insufficient toward this universal goal. EDIFACT is a text-based UN standard focused on trade communication, but falls short due to it's text-based format. SNMP, CIM, HTML, XML, and similar schema-based information gathering/exchange all attempt sub-system standardizations, but fail to solve the global communication interoperability problem.

     The following example can help put this concept in more concrete terms. Today in xSeries we have 8-bit microprocessor (ISMP) system management devices actively managing and monitoring a server's state. Logs entries are generated when issues of concern occur, in a variable hex format like "0xFE004321...". This message translated into English is "At 6pm, Fan 2 Failed, RPM=00". Today we have methods to handle the issue to some extent; the microcontroller can alert and will ramp other fan...