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Method for bit-rate adjustment during quiet periods and beacon periods on a wireless network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130139D
Publication Date: 2005-Oct-12
Document File: 3 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for bit-rate adjustment during quiet periods and beacon periods on a wireless network. Benefits include improved functionality, improved performance, and improved ease of implementation.

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Method for bit-rate adjustment during quiet periods and beacon periods on a wireless network

Disclosed is a method for bit-rate adjustment during quiet periods and beacon periods on a wireless network. Benefits include improved functionality, improved performance, and improved ease of implementation.

Background

              Wireless network standards require quiet periods and beacon periods in the signal. However, streaming video requires continuous intensive data transfer. For example, content server, STA1, on the network streams content to a rendering device, STA2, on a wireless network. STA1 has the capability to adjust the content stream, utilizing algorithm A that samples the current utilization and available capacity on a network, N. The algorithm uses the following values:

•             Tq - Time of the quiet period
•             Tn-1 - Time when the sample starts

•             Bsn - Number of bits during a sample period
•             Psn - Sample period – time over which the bit rate is calculated, (Tn-1 Tn)
•             Rn - Current bit-rate sample, Bs(n)/Psn


              The bit-rate capacity during the last sample time is calculated as follows:

Rn = (Bsn)/Psn

              With conventional transfer rating, the bit rate drops. The notification decreases the transfer rate as buffers fill. Transmit queues are full of higher bit-rate data when the network lull occurs, causing jitter. When the bit rate increases, the buffers write the data (drain) and eventually normalize. More data is required from the client to handle the drop in the bit rate. As a result, the client station buffers data, reducing throughput (see Figure 1).

Description

                            The disclosed method uses wireless network beacon periods to calculate network idle time at or slightly before the perio...