Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic New Table Creation / Destruction on Table Resize

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130151D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Oct-13
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-13
Document File: 1 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Changing the size of a table can be problematic in many scenarios. If the size is reduced, there is a risk of completely destroying viewability of every cell in the table (as there may not be enough space to see a significant section of any cell, if all cells are simultaneously decreased in size). What is needed is a mechanism that will dynamicly create and destroy entire tables, or portions thereof, to accomodate a new available size situation without impacting the size of the cells themselves.

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Dynamic New Table Creation / Destruction on Table Resize

     In this invention, there will be at least one column or row which is considered primary. When a table or its surrounding frame is reduced in size, the column or row that is encroached upon will be destroyed. Display of this row or column will instead be afforded for by one of the following mechanisms:

     In one embodiment, an "overflow" table will be created that consists of the primary row / column and any rows / columns that could not be displayed due to the recent reduction in size. This new table can be created in a new tab, or in the same pane but a preferred location as determined by the rendering engine.

     In another embodiment, and using HTML as an example as the code source for the tables, an attribute could be defined for table rows or columns called "primary" that indicates that this row or column will be duplicated in any automatically generated "overflow" tables.

     In another embodiment, particular rows/columns can be assigned priorities which indicate in which order rows/columns drop out of the original table and are remanifested in the overflow table.

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