Browse Prior Art Database

A Method to Transmit Data Content with its Attributes in a Single Request Via HTTP 1.1 Protocol

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130290D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Oct-18
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-18
Document File: 5 page(s) / 208K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

A method has been devised to transmit data content with its attributes, which can only be determined by reading and processing the data content in its entirety, within one request over the network in a client server model utilizing the HTTP 1.1 protocol. The method uses the chunk transfer encoding with trailer feature of the HTTP 1.1 protocol. In a current content management system for example there is no method for sending data attributes, which can only be determined by reading and processing the data content in its entirety, directly with the data content without significant performance impact. In this scenario or wherever there is a need to transmit data attributes directly with the data content, the present scheme could be used.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 32% of the total text.

Page 1 of 5

A Method to Transmit Data Content with its Attributes in a Single Request Via HTTP 1.1 Protocol

Main Idea & Background

There is no method for sending data attributes, which can only be determined by reading and processing the data content in its entirety, directly with the data content without significant performance impact using the HTTP Protocol.

One specific area where this problem occurs is Data Integrity validation within a content management system. The digital signature for a Data Integrity validation needs to be created by reading the entire document and comparing it with an older/stored digital signature to verify that the data was not tampered with. In a client server infrastructure the client should get a notification about the data integrity validation result while it is retrieving the data. In a scenario - where the proposed scheme is NOT used - the object needs to be read in it's entirety to create the data validation record before the requested data is sent with the validation record to the client. Therefore in this scheme an extra up-front reading would be required to send the data integrity validation result as HTTP header information with its content (in the HTTP body) to the client within one HTTP request/response. But this is an expensive operation since the data needs to be read twice in its entirety; once for creating the validation result and once for sending the content. Typically the HTTP response is formed as HTTP Headers followed by HTTP bodies which contain the actual data. Therefore the validation result needs to be computed first and inserted as a HTTP header before the data content can be sent in the HTTP body.

Another solution would be to send a HTTP request for the data followed by another HTTP request for its data integrity validation result. The validation record would be created while the data is being sent. Since the computation can not be finished until the whole data is sent, the validation result would have to be part of a separate HTTP request/response. This approach would avoid reading the data twice but it is also not desirable since two requests are required to get the content and the data integrity validation result to the client. Moreover it would require that the server and the client maintain a context session to map the validation result to the data content.

The proposed scheme would be to solve this problem within one single request by using the Chunk Transfer Encoding with trailer support of the HTTP 1.1. protocol. The data integrity validation can be sent to the client within the request that delivers the data. It does not require reading the entire data content to produce the data integrity validation up-front nor does it require an extra request to submit the data integrity validation information to the client. The proposed scheme would use the standard open HTTP 1.1 protocol and would not require any proprietary technology.

The Data Integrity Validation is only one example. An...