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INFRARED (IR) DEVICE DATABASE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130385D
Publication Date: 2005-Oct-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Currently the problem with generic infrared (IR) remote controllers (e.g., all-in-one remote controls, watches with remote controls, and PDAs with remote controls) to control stereos, televisions, etc. is that you have to program your controller with the manufacturers details so that it knows what type of signals to send to the television/stereo. This is usually accomplished by referring to your user manual and finding a set of 4-digit numbers that you have to program into your controller. If, as is often the case, the manual is lost or lacks information on the model of your television / stereo, you end up trying different combinations until something works. By creating a single manufacturer-updatable database of controller profiles for different devices on the Internet, manufacturers can then add the profiles of their devices to the the database as they create them, and users can go to this single source every time they want to control a new device. In a handheld, this could be done by having a "Remote Control" application that controls devices which are controlled using IR. Then a user could select "add new device" from a menu and the application goes to the single location on the web and allows the user to select/search for his/her new device and the profile is automatically added to the handheld.

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INFRARED (IR) DEVICE DATABASE

IR Controlled Device Database

Disclosed Anonymously

Currently the problem with generic infrared (IR) remote controllers (e.g., all-in-one remote controls, watches with remote controls, and PDAs with remote controls) to control stereos, televisions, etc. is that you have to program your controller with the manufacturers details so that it knows what type of signals to send to the television/stereo. This is usually accomplished by referring to your user manual and finding a set of 4-digit numbers that you have to program into your controller. If, as is often the case, the manual is lost or lacks information on the model of your television / stereo, you end up trying different combinations until something works.

By creating a single manufacturer-updatable database of controller profiles for different devices on the Internet, manufacturers can then add the profiles of their devices to the the database as they create them, and users can go to this single source every time they want to control a new device.

In a handheld, this could be done by having a "Remote Control" application that controls devices which are controlled using IR. Then a user could select "add new device" from a menu and the application goes to the single location on the web and allows the user to select/search for his/her new device and the profile is automatically added to the handheld.