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PROXIMITY BASED BLUETOOTH INQUIRY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130387D
Publication Date: 2005-Oct-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

PROXIMITY BASED BLUETOOTH INQUIRY Proximity-Based Peripheral Inquiry In Bluetooth Implementations Disclosed Anonymously There is an issue in the Bluetooth specification for discovering peripheral devices. Currently, the discovery procedure is cumbersome when there are multiple Bluetooth devices in range that are in discoverable mode. Pairing is the process by which two Bluetooth devices are introduced to each other and told by the user that they are permitted to work with each other. Before devices are paired, the Bluetooth-enabled host controller must do an inquiry to discover what devices are available for pairing. Normally the user is presented a list of devices available in range. If the user wants to pair with the discovered devices, he/she must select the device in the list and initiate the pairing. The problem occurs when there are more than a manageable number of devices that are available for pairing to the Host Controller. One solution is to list the first 10 (for example) devices that are detected by the mobile. This is problematic if there are more than 10 devices in range with which to pair. The worst situation that can occur is that a user is trying to pair his Bluetooth peripheral (like a wireless handsfree, for instance) to his Bluetooth enabled handset and cannot find his peripheral in the list - he only finds the peripherals belonging to other people. This situation can occur in crowded situations such as conferences, public transit vehicles, transit stations, sporting events, and shopping malls. In industrial applications, this problem can occur at companies which manufacture Bluetooth peripherals, where they need to test many Bluetooth peripherals in close proximity to each other. In some applications, especially in cases where the two Bluetooth devices are within the user's reach, the answer is to list the devices according to their proximity to the host controller. The nearest device will be listed first in the pairing user interface. One way to determine proximity is to use radio signal strength values of the detected peripherals, a feature that is available in the Bluetooth API.

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PROXIMITY BASED BLUETOOTH INQUIRY

Proximity-Based Peripheral Inquiry In Bluetooth Implementations

Disclosed Anonymously

There is an issue in the Bluetooth specification for discovering peripheral devices.  Currently, the discovery procedure is cumbersome when there are multiple Bluetooth devices in range that are in discoverable mode.

Pairing is the process by which two Bluetooth devices are introduced to each other and told by the user that they are permitted to work with each other.  Before devices are paired, the Bluetooth-enabled host controller must do an inquiry to discover what devices are available for pairing.

Normally the user is presented a list of devices available in range.  If the user wants to pair with the discovered devices, he/she must select the device in the list and initiate the pairing. 

The problem occurs when there are more than a manageable number of devices that are available for pairing to the Host Controller. One solution is to list the first 10 (for example) devices that are detected by the mobile.  This is problematic if there are more than 10 devices in range with which to pair. 

The worst situation that can occur is that a user is trying to pair his Bluetooth peripheral (like a wireless handsfree, for instance) to his Bluetooth enabled handset and cannot find his peripheral in the list - he only finds the peripherals belonging to other people.  This situation can occur in crowded situations such as conferences, public transit vehicles,...