Browse Prior Art Database

Voice to Email System and Method on Mobile Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130431D
Publication Date: 2005-Oct-28
Document File: 4 page(s) / 135K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

One problem I find when driving is that it is difficult to reply to a message on a wireless handheld. You can read a message, but it is difficult to reply to a message received on your device. Some of these messages are urgent and require a prompt reply, but it is difficult (and often dangerous) to type a response while you should be focussing on the road! It would be nice to be able to find a safe an efficient way to reply to messages while driving. It would be nice if there is a system that allows you to dictate in a response to e-mail and it will compose a reply and send to recipient The proposed invention - a Voice-to-Email System (VES) - attempts to solve the above problem. Please refer to Fig. 1 and 2 of the attached diagrams for more information. The VES works as follows: • user receives email on device and is driving / pre-occupied, etc • user decides to use VES service to reply to message • user triggers device to go into VES mode (e.g., hold phone button or rollerwheel for 5-10 seconds) • user chooses to reply to message, an option appears for "Reply via Voice-to-Email" • user selects this and an email message is sent to VES server, in the message there is a unique VES ID, a forward of the desired email to reply and recipient of message to reply to (i.e., found in "From" line of email) and subject of email • VES server will now either call user and prompts user to record a message to recipient of email OR, user will call VES automatically after message is sent • user records voice response to email • VES takes voice response and creates Voice Response Message (VRM) in one of 5 ways: 1. saves it as .wav or .mp3 format and posts it on website and provides XML link 2. saves message and provides dial in number and passcode to access saved voice message (e.g., dial in #: 1-877-234-4567, passcode: 12234) 3. forwards voice message to human operator to translate to text, operator will return translated message back to VES 4. forwards voice message to machine translator that does voice to text translation, machine translation will forward translated message back to VES 5. sends VRM in native format (WAV/MP3) to the destination address as an e-mail attachment • VES takes 1 (or more) results of VRM and attaches it to original email to be sent to recipient, note: since user forward email thread to VES, the system has the recpient, subject and entire message thread to repond with • VES sends out message with email header indicating message has been translated using VES service to recipient An example of how this system works is as follows: • John Doe sends you an email while you are driving, message reads as follows: • "Hi Gary, How are you doing? How was the ABC meeting? What do you think of their solution and do you think it is a good fit with our information system? regards, John" • Gary receives message, but is driving and doesn't want to type a response. He thinks of an appropriate response in his head. • Gary triggers Voice-to-Email System (VES) on his device by holding the appropriate button for 5 seconds. • VES applet on device forwards message thread to VES server • VES server calls Gary and prompts him to record response to email • Gary records: • "Hi John, The meeting went well. The sales people were a little pushy, but the solution is solid. It has a strong web-forms solution and powerful rending engine and may be a good fit with our online repository. The programming interface seems to be quite easy to use. The price is reasonable compared to other solutions in industry. I'll touch base with you further once I get back to office tomorrow morning. Gary" • VES translates above voice message to text and attaches trailer "Responses translated by VES" in message • VES sends email reply to John Doe with translated response The system consists of the following components: • an application / applet on mobile device to send email to VES server • a means to trigger the VES mode • a VES server module to record incoming voice messages • a VES server translation module, the translation module can translate the message via human operator, machine translation, create a web / XML link to post URL on Internet, or provide a call in number and password to retrieve message • connection to email server to send email response To the end recipient, it appears that user has typed a message to them using the voice-to-email service / server as intermediary. To the user, it is convenient because it allows them to respond to message without typing. The solution may be useful for people driving and busy people who have many urgent messages that require short responses. For example, a busy doctor, lawyer, stockbroker might dictate a response and the system will send a response off for him (i.e., he has no time to type it out). The solution may also be useful with people with disabilities (i.e., handicap in hand or arm and might not be able to type out a response). There are othe features and alternatives to be added to this invention (to be disclosed later). This solution is not limited to smartphones have data and voice capabilities. It can be extended to any email system or instant messaging. Another use of this technology is that if you have many emails to go through, you can use a Voice to Email System (VES) and quickly record a response and have it emailed to recipient. I think this solution is unique and may encapsulate two inventions (refer Fig. 1): 1. Concept of Voice-to-Email System to respond to messages on mobile device. 2. Concept of forwarding unique ID and email message to VES server and attaching translated result in response to message This invention will not focus on how voice-to-text translation takes place (i.e., machine translation, human operator translation, etc). There are other technologies well known in the art that can handle this. I don't think I have seen any solution like this in market.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

VOICE TO EMAIL SYSTEM

Voice to Email System and Method on Mobile Device

Disclosed Anonymously

One problem I find when driving is that it is difficult to reply to a message on a wireless handheld. You can read a message, but it is difficult to reply to a message received on your device.

Some of these messages are urgent and require a prompt reply, but it is difficult (and often dangerous) to type a response while you should be focussing on the road!

It would be nice to be able to find a safe an efficient way to reply to messages while driving. It would be nice if there is a system that allows you to dictate in a response to e-mail and it will compose a reply and send to recipient

The proposed invention - a Voice-to-Email System (VES) - attempts to solve the above problem. Please refer to Fig. 1 and 2 of the attached diagrams for more information.

The VES works as follows:

·        user receives email on device and is driving / pre-occupied, etc

·        user decides to use VES service to reply to message

·        user triggers device to go into VES mode (e.g., hold phone button or rollerwheel for 5-10 seconds)

·        user chooses to reply to message, an option appears for "Reply via Voice-to-Email"

·        user selects this and an email message is sent to VES server, in the message there is a unique VES ID, a forward of the desired email to reply and recipient of message to reply to (i.e., found in "From" line of email) and subject of email

·        VES server will now either call user and prompts user to record a message to recipient of email OR, user will call VES automatically after message is sent

·        user records voice response to email

·        VES takes voice response and creates Voice Response Message (VRM) in one of 5 ways:

1.       saves it as .wav or .mp3 format and posts it on website and provides XML link

2.       saves message and provides dial in number and passcode to access saved voice message (e.g., dial in #: 1-877-234-4567, passcode: 12234)

3.       forwards voice message to human operator to translate to text, operator will return translated message back to VES

4.       forwards voice message to machine translator that does voice to text translation, machine translation will forward translated message back to VES

5.      sends VRM in native format (WAV/MP3) to the destination address as an e-mail attachment

·        VES takes 1 (or more) results of VRM and attaches it to original email to be sent to recipient, note: since user forward email thread to VES, the system has the recpient, subject and entire message thread to repond with

·        VES sends out message with email header indicating message has been translated using VES service to recipient

An example of how this system works is as follows:

 

  • John Doe sends you an email while you are driving, message reads as follows:
  • "Hi Gary, How are you doing? How was the ABC meeting? What do you think of their solution and do you think it is a good fit with our information system?  regards, John"
  • Gary receives message, but is driving and doesn't want to type...