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Heads-Up Display with Retinal Tracking for Handheld Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130459D
Publication Date: 2005-Oct-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 8K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Typing while driving is exceptionally hard and certainly dangerous. By adapting technology used in US Air Force Heads Up displays and incorporating it as part of an overall handheld solution, a safer and more effective means of handheld operation can be achieved. If fighter pilots can fly and shoot down targets at Mach 3, then drivers should at least be able use the heads-up displays while driving.

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Heads-Up Display for Handheld Device

Retinal Heads-Up Display with Retinal Tracking for Handheld Device

Disclosed Anonymously

Typing and while driving is exceptionally hard and certainly dangerous.  By adapting technology used in US Air Force Heads Up displays and incorporating it as part of an overall handheld solution, a safer and more effective means of handheld operation can be achieved.  If fighter pilots can fly and shoot down targets at Mach 3, then drivers should at least be able use the heads-up displays while driving.

The invention features a screen projection of the handheld’s menus against a transparent piece of plastic. Much like in podium Teleprompters, except that in this case the piece of plastic is an appendage to eye wear, (either a miniature screen or utilising existing eye glass lens) and sensory inputs are able to track your retinal movements for menu selection.  The device could also be Bluetooth enabled.  As such, the driver’s field of vision is maintained on the road, while at the same time the driver can use his blackberry without taking his eyes of the road.

Actual "Heads Up" technology is likely to already exist in a military application but certainly not designed and integrated in wireless data products.  Can't find anything with retinal activation for wireless devices.