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Centralized Carrier ID Read System Enabling Carrier ID Verification in Storage Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130475D
Publication Date: 2005-Oct-25
Document File: 5 page(s) / 195K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a centralized carrier ID read system that enables 100% carrier ID verification for storage devices, and for all carriers that are inducted or removed from the device. Benefits include reducing the total storage device cost by decreasing the number of ID readers required.

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Centralized Carrier ID Read System Enabling Carrier ID Verification in Storage Devices

Disclosed is a method for a centralized carrier ID read system that enables 100% carrier ID verification for storage devices, and for all carriers that are inducted or removed from the device.

Benefits include reducing the total storage device cost by decreasing the number of ID readers required.

Background

Current storage systems do not provide a cost effective way for verifying the identity of every carrier that is inducted or removed from the storage system. Carrier ID verification is an essential step in carrier processing in semiconductor manufacturing. The lack of 100% ID verification has proven to be problematic in several cases, including Interbay input and output port (I/O) activity and manual output ports. The problems include: carriers lost in the system, the wrong carriers delivered to the I/O ports, and excess carrier movements occurring to and from the I/O ports. However, achieving 100% verification with existing, non-centralized methods would be costly, and could reduce system reliability due to added components.

Currently, typical storage systems have carrier ID readers on the Intrabay input and output ports, as well as the manual input port; however, the system still has three additional ports where carriers may be inducted or removed (i.e. the Interbay input port, the Interbay output port, and the manual output port).  Since these ports do not have readers, they do not provide100% carrier ID verification capability (see Figures 1 through 3; various configurations and other facility/surrounding constraints could exist). Depending on the type of problem that occurs, there are specific recovery procedures that are required for the storage device. For example, lost carriers may be located by purging the storage system, which requires a significant amount of time and resources. Wrong carrier movements are typically addressed by sending the carrier to the manual output port for the factory personnel to resolve the issue. In either case, the storage and transport systems are generating movements of the carriers that are unnecessary; this ties up the system capacity and/or may hinder system performance. Today, the storage system relies on the Material Control System (MCS) to track carriers and know their locations. Reliance on software systems does not guarantee that the correct...