Browse Prior Art Database

System and Method of Messaging and Verification on a Mobile Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130497D
Publication Date: 2005-Oct-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 10K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

To test messaging on a mobile messaging server, there are literally hundreds of thousands of possible combinations. For example, for a Lotus Notes platform, to even test a small subset of all possible messages, they must be manually drafted at a Notes Client, then sent to the mobile device. This is a very time-consuming task for testers. Due to its labour-intensive nature, the amount of messaging testing performed on a mobile messaging server is minimal compared to the amount that could be done with the help of a script such as the one being proposed. The user will simply have to run the script from a Notes Client, input the SMTP addresses of the users, and the messages will automatically be sent to the devices. This drastically cuts down on the amount of time required to test messaging, even without the handheld verification application.

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MESSAGING AND VERIFICATION

System and Method of Messaging and Verification on a

Mobile

Device

Disclosed Anonymously

To test messaging on a mobile messaging server, there are literally hundreds of thousands of possible combinations.  For example, for a Lotus Notes platform, to even test a small subset of all possible messages, they must be manually drafted at a Notes Client, then sent to the mobile device.  This is a very time-consuming task for testers.  Due to its labour-intensive nature, the amount of messaging testing performed on a mobile messaging server is minimal compared to the amount that could be done with the help of a script such as the one being proposed.  The user will simply have to run the script from a Notes Client, input the SMTP addresses of the users, and the messages will automatically be sent to the devices.  This drastically cuts down on the amount of time required to test messaging, even without the handheld verification application. 

Without this device application, the user would then have to examine each message manually on the device to ensure their proper delivery.  However, with the device application, they can either manually fire it after all of the messages from the script have been received, or it will fire automatically, triggered by a specific message sent from the client messaging script.  With both components (script and handheld application), the user will merely configure and execute the script, and be automatically sent a test report once the emails have been sent to the device and checked by the handheld application. 

This opens the door to a wide range of tests that can be conducted, even overnight while the tester is at home.  The potential for increased test coverage with regards to messaging on the mobile messaging server is tremendous.  The script alone (or the handheld application, too) could be sent as a package to a customer with a Beta Release for quick evaluation, for example.  It can be easily modified to test specific messages that are required by a test plan.  We have seen a dramatic reduction in testing time with regards to messaging while utilizing the script alone.

One proposed solution is a combination of a LotusScript that sends a variety of messages to a list of SMTP addresses entered by the user, and a handheld application that searches the message list on the device to ensure that all of the messages were received...