Browse Prior Art Database

System and Method of Displaying Transparent JPEG Images

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130515D
Publication Date: 2005-Oct-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

There are two common types of image compression and formats used on the internet. A. GIF and PNG-8 images use a color palette and are capable of efficiently encoding images with limited color information. These image formats support the concept of transparent or semi-transparent images. B. JPEG images efficiently encode images with lots of color information by removing from photo-realistic images the redundant information that is not important to the perception of the human eye. JPEG images are lossy. JPEG image handlers do not commonly support the concept of transparency. The problem is that if you have an image that contains photo-realistic color information and transparency, you are can't use JPEG compression because it doesn't support transparency and you are forced to use GIF or PNG which are less effective for these types of images. By splitting photo-realistic images into separate opaque and transparent components the opaque image data can be saved using a jpeg file format and the transparent data can be saved as a “png” file. The image components can then be re-assembled when used without requiring support for a new image type. The device already supports the widely used JPEG and PNG formats. The benefits of this type of compression are significant. As an example, the T-Mobile theme contains photo-realistic application icons with transparency. The transparency is required in order to blend with the background. The size of the application icons (when saved in a single image) is 227,529 bytes. The size of the opaque image data when saved using JPEG is 60,639 bytes and the size of the transparency image data is 17,279 bytes. Together the size is 77,918 bytes or a savings of 149,611 bytes. Without using this technique, it would not be possible to take advantage of the benefits of JPEG compression with these images. This same technique can benefit applications on the device in general or internet content. A compiler or server may programmatically detect when this technique is applicable given an image and may be able to save the image data separately in an application and re-constitute the image at runtime without requiring manual modification to the application. The same is true for Internet content.

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TRANSPARENT JPEG IMAGES

           

System and Method of Displaying Transparent JPEG Images

Disclosed Anonymously

There are two common types of image compression and formats used on the internet. 

A.  GIF and PNG-8 images use a color palette and are capable of efficiently encoding images with limited color information.  These image formats support the concept of transparent or semi-transparent images.

B.  JPEG images efficiently encode images with lots of color information by removing from photo-realistic images the redundant information that is not important to the perception of the human eye. JPEG images are lossy. JPEG image handlers do not commonly support the concept of transparency.

The problem is that if you have an image that contains photo-realistic color information and transparency, you are can't use JPEG compression because it doesn't support transparency and you are forced to use GIF or PNG which are less effective for these types of images. 

By splitting photo-realistic images into separate opaque and transparent components the opaque image data can be saved using a jpeg file format and the transparent data can be saved as a “png” file.

The image components can then be re-assembled when used without requiring support for a new image type. The device already supports the widely used JPEG and PNG formats.

The benefits of this type of compression are significant.  As an example, the T-Mobile theme contains photo-realistic application icons wit...