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System to Enhance -Type e-mail Communication

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130551D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Oct-26
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a user interface technique to facilitate, when appropriate, a more efficient e-mail communication system when brief messages are sent. With this technique, an e-mail sender may rely upon a system in the e-mail client that counts the number of characters in an e-mail body. If that total number of characters is less than a user-specified limit, the system will automatically move that e-mail body text into the subject line and append a tag, such as "" (end of message), thereby notifying recipients that the entire communication of the e-mail is carried in the subject line. Further, the same system may be configured to automatically append an -type tag to the subject line text when no text is detected in the body of the e-mail.

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System to Enhance <EOM>-Type e-mail Communication

Disclosed is a user interface technique to facilitate, when appropriate, a more efficient e-mail communication system when brief messages are sent. With this technique, an e-mail sender may rely upon a system in the e-mail client that counts the number of characters in an e-mail body. If that total number of characters is less than a user-specified limit, the system will automatically move that e-mail body text into the subject line and append a tag, such as "<EOM>" (end of message), thereby notifying recipients that the entire communication of the e-mail is carried in the subject line. Further, the same system may be configured to automatically append an <EOM>-type tag to the subject line text when no text is detected in the body of the e-mail.

An advantage of this technique is that users who are unfamiliar with the <EOM> convention may be introduced to this standard of "netiquette" and rely upon it when composing all future e-mails. (Of course, this system would likely have to be enabled by default for this to occur.) Likewise, users who do use the <EOM> convention may find benefits in a system that detects the quantity of content in the e-mail body and either notifies them that this text may be more efficiently communicated in the subject line, or simply saves the user time by automatically appending an indication tag, such as "<EOM>", at the end of the subject line.

At the point when the user activates the "se...