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ASYNCHRONOUS, ACTIVE MONITORING OF COMMAND ACTIONS IN A WEB HOSTED APPLICATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130581D
Publication Date: 2005-Oct-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Web applications are designed to present static or dynamic content to a user upon request via a web browser such as Internet Explorer. Web applications respond to user requests via the HTTP protocol and return content suitable to the request. Thus web applications are traditionally designed to answer a request. Without a request there is no response and indeed in the HTTP protocol there is no provision for pushing information to an end user through the browser. Traditionally a web application allows a user to execute a command or operation and then synchronously displays the results via HTML content returned to the browser.

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ASYNCHRONOUS, ACTIVE MONITORING OF COMMAND ACTIONS IN A WEB HOSTED APPLICATION

Web applications are designed to present static or dynamic content to a user upon request via a web browser such as Internet Explorer. Web applications respond to user requests via the HTTP protocol and return content suitable to the request. Thus web applications are traditionally designed to answer a request.  Without a request there is no response and indeed in the HTTP protocol there is no provision for pushing information to an end user through the browser. Traditionally a web application allows a user to execute a command or operation and then synchronously displays the results via HTML content returned to the browser.

If a user wishes to execute more than one command at a time or submit commands to be completed in the future that is beyond the traditional scope of a web application. The web server architecture presented here provides a mechanism allowing multiple items of work to be submitted by a user or users. The architecture then provides for an activity monitor that shows the status of multiple items of work executing asynchronously. The user can examine and monitor an individual item in detail or watch multiple operations simultaneously. The user’s web browser is updated automatically or upon user request (per user preference). Once submitted, activity execution does not depend on user actions, although the user has the capability to cancel and/or delete an activity.

Monitored acti...