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Scented Surgical and Infection Control Products

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130703D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Elaine Namba: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Disposable products used in health care environments typically lack fragrance, but a variety of opportunities exist for product improvements through the use of aroma. For example, by adding a fragrance or scent to face masks, surgical gowns or surgical drapes, table coverings, or other disposable elements used by physicians, found in clinics or doctors’ offices, and so forth, several benefits can be achieved for either health care workers or patients.

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Scented Surgical and Infection Control Products

Elaine Namba, Deanna Kathumbi-Jackson, Tameka Spence, Julie Ambrose, Todd Leak, and Kellie Goodrich

     Kimberly-Clark Corporation Roswell, Georgia and Neenah, Wisconsin

Disposable products used in health care environments typically lack fragrance, but a variety of opportunities exist for product improvements through the use of aroma. For example, by adding a fragrance or scent to face masks, surgical gowns or surgical drapes, table coverings, or other disposable elements used by physicians, found in clinics or doctors' offices, and so forth, several benefits can be achieved for either health care workers or patients.

User emotional response and comfort perception can be enhanced by introducing fragrance, directly onto the product, or as a separate component. In some cases, the benefit of the fragrance can go beyond comfort to improve human performance. For example, some aromas such as citrus or spearmint have been associated with increased alertness. It is hypothesized that such aromas, appropriately delivered, could help improve performance of workers such as surgeons who must face long hours of work and need to maintain high alertness.

Examples include:

1. Adding a layer to the product, such as the outer facing of a face mask, which would include the scent. For example, adding a bubble gum scent to a child's mask, or adding a vanilla scent to a patient mask. Scents may be distributed in the materials of the product (e.g., impregnated in fibers of a nonwoven), contained in microcapsules, or be provided in any other known vehicle.

2. Adding scent to a surgical drape, either directly in/on the fabric, or a...