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Method for physically securing a Desktop PC and Display monitor via a single Kennsington Lock

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130721D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Nov-02
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 89K

Publishing Venue

Lenovo

Abstract

Method for physically securing a Desktop PC and Display monitor via a single Kennsington Lock

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Method for physically securing a Desktop PC and Display monitor via a single Kennsington Lock

     As desktop PC's trend smaller and proliferation of TFT displays increases, physical security against theft of these physically small yet high-valued commodities becomes a significant problem. Various existing devices provide security for these high value devices today including Kennsington and Cable locks. However, these all require a separate locking device for each commodity requiring protection. This requires maintaining and using multiple keys per installation which can rapidly become onerous for a large installation as in a corporation or other large institutions. Furthermore, the smaller and more TFT-centric nature of the newest PCs lends them to be more prominently displayed, for example in customer interfacing locations where multiple unsightly security cables are not ideal and not conducive to creating the desired atmosphere. What is lacking is a single locking scheme providing required physical security for all high valued commodities (i.e. PC and TFT) simultaneously in a seamless and unobtrusive manner.

     In response to the problem described above, we propose a 3 in 1 PC/TFT lock which provides cover locking and physical tethering for the PC while also physically securing the TFT all under one key.

There are a total of three locking functions fulfilled by this proposal.

     Starting with the PC locking functions, there are 2 main goals. First is physically securing the PC. This is commonly done today using a Kennsington lock which...