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PACING LEAD STABILIZER WITH MODIFIED SLIT GEOMETRY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000130753D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-03
Document File: 5 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This invention relates to a pacing lead stabilizer, a device that is often used to anchor an implanted lead to the subcutaneous tissue near the vein entry site. Specifically, the present invention employs an improved slit geometry to improve the overall performance of a split-lumen stabilizer.

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PACING LEAD STABILIZER WITH MODIFIED SLIT GEOMETRY

          A pacing lead stabilizer is often used to anchor an implanted lead to the subcutaneous tissue near the vein entry site.  Doing so prevents lead migration and dislodgement.  Typically, a pacing lead stabilizer has a cylindrical body with an axial lumen through which the lead passes.  The physician ties one or more sutures around the stabilizer and subcutaneous tissue to anchor the lead in place.  The body of the stabilizer, usually constructed from various biomedical grade polymers, acts as a protective barrier between the suturing material and the insulation of the lead body to prevent insulation and/or conductor failure.       For catheter delivered leads, the stabilizer is typically packaged separately from the lead and must be assembled onto the lead after the catheter or delivery system is removed.  Stabilizers have been designed to accommodate this step by slitting the lumen of the stabilizer along its length.  However, assembling the stabilizer onto the lead is often a difficult process.  Additionally, after the stabilizer is assembled, the stabilizer has a tendency to buckle and fall off the lead when sliding into the pocket.         

          The present invention employs an improved slit geometry to improve the overall performance of a split-lumen stabilizer. FIGS. 1A and 1B show a pacing lead stabilizer 10 according to one embodiment of the present invention. The pacing lead stabilizer 10 is a hollow, tubular body 12 sized to slidingly receive a pacing lead. The body 12 defines an open inner lumen 14 for receiving the pacing lead and has an outer surface formed with grooves 16 for receiving sutures. The stabilizer 10 also includes a pair of opposing fins 18 extending from the body 12 of the stabilizer. The fins 18 are optionally detachable from the stabilizer body 12.

          FIG. 1B shows a lead 22 positioned for assembly with the stabilizer 10.  The stabilizer 10 further includes a slit 20 that extends through the length of the body 12 for facilitating assembly with the lead 22.  As shown in FIG. 1B, the cross-section of the slit 20 has an extreme taper such that the width of the slit 20 is much larger on the outside of the stabilizer body 12 than on the inside.  When assembling the stabilizer 10 and lead 22, the tapered slit 20 guides the lead 22 into the lumen 14 and helps to spread the body 12 at the slit 20 to accommodate the lead 22 without requiring the use of tabs or the fins 18 to pry the stabilizer body 12 open.  Once the lead 22 is positioned in the lumen 14, the small width of slit 20 on...