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Access control utilizing a Subscriber Identity Module

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131178D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Nov-09
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Arvinder Singh: AUTHOR

Abstract

Today most access control is either in the form of a physical device (a key) or a code (PIN) that is keyed in (or a combination of both in credit cards). This document describes a new access control mechanism which is based on the Subscriber Identification Module (SIM) card within a mobile subscriber (e.g. a mobile phone). In summary, the access control mechanism would “read” the identity from the SIM card of the mobile subscriber using, for example, Bluetooth, which eliminates the need for a special purpose access device (e.g. a key) or code for access control.

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Access control utilizing a Subscriber Identity Module (SIM)

Arvinder Singh

Abstract

Today most access control is either in the form of a physical device (a key) or a code (PIN) that is keyed in (or a combination of both in credit cards).  This document describes a new access control mechanism which is based on the Subscriber Identification Module (SIM) card within a mobile subscriber (e.g. a mobile phone).  In summary, the access control mechanism would “read” the identity from the SIM card of the mobile subscriber using, for example, Bluetooth, which eliminates the need for a special purpose access device (e.g. a key) or code for access control.

What is the problem

Access control plays an important role in our lives. For example, we “protect” our homes with access control by having a lock.  Similarly our work places also require access control. The most significant challenges for an access control mechanism are:

·        To ensure that the access is not compromised, i.e. that “not authorized” people do not gain access; and

·        To have a simple mechanism, i.e. to provide “authorized” access without too much control.

The two challenges are contradictory in the sense that one is to safeguard access while the other is to accommodate access, thus the task is to find a solution that balances between these two.

The conventional solution

A very common access control mechanism is a mechanical solution such as a door lock, wherein the access control mechanism involves “verifying” that an inserted key enables access (i.e. unlock the door). Today, this mechanical lock has a corresponding electronic version, where the lock is replaced with a device such as a key-pad. The key in this case is replaced with a code that is entered and verified by the access control mechanism.

Common to these solutions is that they do provide a good solution for the two challenges.  However, they require “authorized” people to obtain a “key”, which is special for the particular access control point. The electronic solution is in that sense better, as a person only needs to remember a code, but with codes for entering your house, work place (in fact there would probably be more entry points within the work place) and sports-clubs most people would get in trouble remembering each of these different codes. The codes are assigned by the site containing the access point, and it is very unlikely that all the codes could be made identical (and it would not even be in the interest of the user, as h...