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Distributed Processing: Guest Editors' Introduction

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131218D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Andries van Dam: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This issue of Computer is based on two workshops in distributed processing held at Brown University August 17- 19, 1976, and August 3-5, 1977. Sponsored by the Army Research Office, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research, the workshops attempted to define what distributed processing means and to develop a taxonomy of distributed processing applications and techniques. Achievements to date and outstanding research problems were examined in an attempt to find either commonality of problems and solutions or substantial differences.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1978 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Distributed Processing: Guest Editors' Introduction

Andries van Dam

John Stankovic
Brown University This issue of Computer is based on two workshops in distributed processing held at Brown University August 17- 19, 1976, and August 3-5, 1977. Sponsored by the Army Research Office, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research, the workshops attempted to define what distributed processing means and to develop a taxonomy of distributed processing applications and techniques. Achievements to date and outstanding research problems were examined in an attempt to find either commonality of problems and solutions or substantial differences.

Time limitations prevented us from addressing the entire field. For example, we excluded economic and managerial issues, focusing instead on distinctive technological issues. Both workshops dealt primarily with the least routine, most unexplored research areas in distributed processing. These types of distributed processing may be characterized by the cooperation of multiple autonomous processors (and other resources) to execute a single job, typically a large- scale application program. Of interest, for example, was flexible, possibly even dynamic scheduling of resources, such as runtime binding of program and/or data modules to processors.

The first paper in this issue provides definitions, a trial taxonomy, and some observations. A summary of the sessions from both workshops follows. The issue concludes with three papers based on the workshops but solicited especially for this issue. These papers discuss a high- performance distributed architecture, distributed database issues, and network operating systems, respectively.

The summary of the sessions in this issue is based on transcripts provided during the workshops by teams of session recorders. The transcripts were revised through several editing cycles by the participants while the workshops were still in progress. The full 1976 transcripts have been published in Computer Architect...