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Computer Science and Computer Engineering Education in the 80's

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131236D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 19 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Udo W. Pooch: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

The past few years have witnessed an accelerating pace of curricula development in the realm of computer science and computer engineering education. Professional societies, those in universities, and those in industry have been developing model curricula that mesh computer science and computer engineering, but only with much difficulty and sometimes heated debate. There is considerable concern among educators, individuals involved with the computer industry, and students that much must be done to provide cohesive programs in computer This article represents a consensus of the authors' views, but does not necessarily reflect their individual opinions or those of the organizations they represent science and computer engineering programs at colleges and universities, and junior and community colleges. In far too many situations, the student is placed in a position of having to choose between a computer science or computer engineering curriculum, rather than being able to choose a computer science and computer engineering curriculum. The unfortunate result is that a student ventures into industry ill-prepared for the challenges that he will meet.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1978 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Computer Science and Computer Engineering Education in the 80's

Udo W. Pooch

Texas A & M University

Richard H. Austing

University of Maryland

Rabul Chattergy

University of Hawaii

Michael C. Mulder

Bonneville Power Administration

The computer's pervasiveness in the 1980's will demand even more professional talent, broader computer ed ucation, and perhaps even licensing of the computer professional. Industry, education, and professional groups must cooperate to meet these challenges.

This paper offers an opinion as to what can be expected in computer science and computer engineering education in the 1980's. We initially examine the current status of undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education curricula development and treat international curricula development and accreditation efforts as auxiliary issues. Next, we discuss the need, supply, and demand for new graduates and those who continue their professional education, and follow with an assessment of the need for further cooperation between universities and industry. We also examine the effect of international cooperation and the impact of the registration and licensing issues. With these factors firmly in mind, we offer a profile of a computer science and computer engineering graduate in the 1980's, as well as a prognosis of the future, outlining the challenges that both academia and industry will face.

Overview of curricula development

The past few years have witnessed an accelerating pace of curricula development in the realm of computer science and computer engineering education. Professional societies, those in universities, and those in industry have been developing model curricula that mesh computer science and computer engineering, but only with much difficulty and sometimes heated debate. There is considerable concern among educators, individuals involved with the computer industry, and students that much must be done to provide cohesive programs in computer

This article represents a consensus of the authors' views, but does not necessarily reflect their individual opinions or those of the organizations they represent

science and computer engineering programs at colleges and universities, and junior and community colleges. In far too many situations, the student is placed in a position of having to choose between a computer science or computer engineering curriculum, rather than being able to choose a computer science and computer engineering curriculum. The unfortunate result is that a student ventures into industry ill-prepared for the challenge...