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Browse Prior Art Database

Interactive Graphics Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131257D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Anthony P. Lucido: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Texas A&M University The new user of interactive graphics systems probably doesn't know much about the tradeoffs and options involved with using interactive input/output equipment. And there are few sources of introductory material on the subject. This issue attempts to provide such a source. In this spirit, you will find an article by Ohlson that discusses graphics input devices -- joysticks, tablets, light pens, etc. Ohlson describes the basic operation of the devices and some of the applications in which they may be effectively employed.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1978 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Interactive Graphics Devices

Guest Editor's Introduction

Anthony P. Lucido
Texas A&M University

The new user of interactive graphics systems probably doesn't know much about the tradeoffs and options involved with using interactive input/output equipment. And there are few sources of introductory material on the subject. This issue attempts to provide such a source.

In this spirit, you will find an article by Ohlson that discusses graphics input devices -- joysticks, tablets, light pens, etc. Ohlson describes the basic operation of the devices and some of the applications in which they may be effectively employed.

Interactive display devices are covered in the articles by Preiss and Lucido. Preiss discusses the direct view storage tube display and its operating environment; Lucido reviews directed beam cathode ray tube display technology.

Rounding out the issue, Machover presents an informal history of computer graphics based on his personal experiences with the technology from the days of Whirlwind to the present. Finally, Capowski

i discusses...