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A SURVEY OF DEVELOPMENTS IN DISTRIBUTED DATA BASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131271D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 15 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Fred J. Maryanski: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Distributed data base classification Development of a completely general distributed data base management system must evolve through several less complex forms (see table). It begins with data base management systems for single, general-purpose computers, the development of which is among the most significant events in computer science. Many such systems are commercially available. The next class is data base machines,

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A SURVEY OF DEVELOPMENTS IN DISTRIBUTED DATA BASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Fred J. Maryanski Kansas State University

Distributed data base classification

Development of a completely general distributed data base management system must evolve through several less complex forms (see table). It begins with data base management systems for single, general-purpose computers, the development of which is among the most significant events in computer science. Many such systems are commercially available. The next class is data base machines,

which are special-purpose processors whose function is data managements These two classes are combined, in a sense, in a network of two or more machines, one of which is dedicated to the data base management function. The dedicated data base processor, known as the back- end machine, may contain specialized hardware for firmware, or it may be a general-purpose computer.

Next in this classification is a special-purpose distributed DBMS. Several such systems have been implemented on computer networks, including medical information systems,34 airline reservation systems,5 and others. All the computers in such a system are essentially identical, with hardware and software designed specifically for the DBMS.

The next step in distributed DBMS development is a single software system running on a homogeneous network. This stage utilizes conventional facilities for communication between machines, which many hardware manufacturers provide, but requires the data base software to be enhanced for communication between tasks residing in different processors. This is different from the previous step in that the various processors in an airline reservation system, for example, are all performing the same task -- maintaining an inventory of available seats. The problems of file allocation, privacy, and deadlock become quite complex at this level.

By introducing different brands of processors, the network becomes heterogeneous, and compatibility problems appear. Communication protocols and data conversion schemes are necessary for this extension.

Finally, the most general distributed DBMS has hardware obtained from multiple vendors, and accommodate users with different data base software systems. In addition to containing all the problems of the previously mentioned systems, these systems impose the difficult task of data base translation, which entails both structural and code conversion.

Today research is ongoing in all of the problem areas mentioned in this classification. Although some simpler systems...