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ON THE DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF DATA BASES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131273D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 15 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Peter Scheuermann: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Within the past few years data base management systems have received an increasingly large share of the computing world's efforts. They are attractive, despite their high processing cost, because they relieve the programmer of the need to program frequently used operations such as access methods for complicated data structures and variable-length fields, records, and files. As data base management systems become more flexible they also allow unanticipated queries to be answered with relative ease. All this additional flexibility, however, places an ever- increasing burden on the data base designer/ administrator, who must choose among the plenitude of strategies available to map the information onto physical storage. The task of choosing an efficient file organization is very important and extremely difficult to handle. There is a need for systematic and high-level aids which facilitate evaluating the performance of various implementation strategies. Before we can discuss evaluation we need to consider the available options. This analysis is presented in the next section within the framework of a multi-level architecture for data base systems. Having defined these options, we go on to survey various performance evaluation tools for alternative file organizations and discuss their inherent limitations. Finally, we single out simulation models and show how they can provide a feasible approach for incorporating decision-making parameters at different levels of hierarchy and with different degrees of detail.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1978 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

ON THE DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF DATA BASES

Peter Scheuermann

Northwestern University

Introduction

Within the past few years data base management systems have received an increasingly large share of the computing world's efforts. They are attractive, despite their high processing cost, because they relieve the programmer of the need to program frequently used operations such as access methods for complicated data structures and variable-length fields, records, and files. As data base management systems become more flexible they also allow unanticipated queries to be answered with relative ease.

All this additional flexibility, however, places an ever- increasing burden on the data base designer/ administrator, who must choose among the plenitude of strategies available to map the information onto physical storage. The task of choosing an efficient file organization is very important and extremely difficult to handle. There is a need for systematic and high-level aids which facilitate evaluating the performance of various implementation strategies.

Before we can discuss evaluation we need to consider the available options. This analysis is presented in the next section within the framework of a multi-level architecture for data base systems. Having defined these options, we go on to survey various performance evaluation tools for alternative file organizations and discuss their inherent limitations. Finally, we single out simulation models and show how they can provide a feasible approach for incorporating decision-making parameters at different levels of hierarchy and with different degrees of detail.

A framework for data base systems design

Although many factors play a role in the design of a particular data base management system, a number of features are essential for all future integrated systems,'2 as summarized in Table 1.

Data sharing among programs (possible operating in a network environment) is the first, and most obvious, requirement of such systems. It implies the existence of a centralized location for all the data utilized in an organization -- the data bank -- and the use of a data directory, which carries definitive information about the data bank and about proprietary characteristics such as security or privacy constraints.

(Image Omitted: Table 1. Integrated data base management system.)

DESIRED FEATURES TECHNIQUES USED

CENTRALIZED DATA BANK CENTRALIZED DATA BANK

DATA SHARING

MULTIPLE ACCESS PATHS

IEEE Computer Society, Feb 01, 1978 Page 1 IEEE Computer Volume 11 Number 2, Pages 46-55

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