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COMPUTERS ON THE COLLEGE RODEO CIRCUIT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131274D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 9 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Joel Shechter: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Leaping from the saddle of a speeding horse onto a 500- pound steer and wrestling it to the ground may seem to have little to do with science or computers. Yet ";bulldogging,"; as this event is known, as well as the sport of rodeo as a whole, depends increasingly on computer techniques. Today's rodeo athletes learn their skills in high school and college rodeos, and they perfect their abilities in private schools taught by specialists. Even the events in which these serious riders and ropers compete are likely to be scheduled, scored, and administered by computer.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1978 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

COMPUTERS ON THE COLLEGE RODEO CIRCUIT

Joel Shechter

Idaho State University

Leaping from the saddle of a speeding horse onto a 500- pound steer and wrestling it to the ground may seem to have little to do with science or computers. Yet "bulldogging," as this event is known, as well as the sport of rodeo as a whole, depends increasingly on computer techniques. Today's rodeo athletes learn their skills in high school and college rodeos, and they perfect their abilities in private schools taught by specialists. Even the events in which these serious riders and ropers compete are likely to be scheduled, scored, and administered by computer.

Rodeos had their origin in the Southwest in the 1860's. During the Civil War years, cattle herds in the Southwest had multiplied beyond the capacity of the land to sustain them. So began the historic trail drives to the North with its grass and its railheads connecting the West with the war- starved East. In between the drives, trail-hardened cowboys amused themselves in impromptu riding and roping contests. A few communities offered the use of their town squares for these exciting events. Soon they began offering prizes and charging the spectators admission. Rodeo was born.

Today, this truly American sport attracts at least 40 million spectators. There are about 600 professional rodeos a year, including such colorful pageants as the Cheyenne Frontier Days in Wyoming and the Calgary Stampede in Alberta, Canada. And rodeo is an important part of the curricula of many Western colleges. Almost 100 of these schools belong to NIRA, the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association.

Computer-based systems are proving to be a boon to the sport of rodeo. Before the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association installed its computerized Central Entry System,' Z contestants spent hours in phone booths trying to break through busy signals to enter a rodeo. Now a professional cowboy can enter a rodeo in minutes. This is particularly important to championship riders and ropers who must juggle their schedules to compete in several rodeos per week. (Championships are awarded on the basis of total money won annually in a particular event.) Within the near future, current point standings and membership records also will be placed in the Central Entry System. Intercollegiate point standings have been maintained on a batch processing system at Montana State University for some years. The data base is used to determine eligibility for the Collegiate National Finals Rodeo in June.

One of the most successful co...