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The New and the Not So New

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131285D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 10 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Matthew F. Slana: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Memory updating was one theme of the sixth annual workshop of the IEEE Computer Society's Technical Committee on Computer Elements, held last June in Vail, Colorado. As is traditional with many Computer Society workshops, this report is a collection of unattributed comments from individual workshop attendees whose anonymity was preserved in order to encourage a candid exchange of points of view. Memory technology today constitutes a mix of both the new and the not so new. Semiconductor RAM, introduced in 1970, is taking more of the market, but core memory -- a technology that is over 20 years old -- is projected to hold constant at least through 1980. CCD, introduced commercially in 1975, may go to 250Kbit chips at less than 10 millicents/ bit in this period and may capture a small portion of the disk market by 1985. Meanwhile disks, which have been around since 1956, retain a large share of the bulk market in the face of the new technologies. By the same token, the basic concepts in word processing, distributed files, and digital communications that promise to revolutionize information handling in business are not very new either. What is new is the continuing decline in semiconductor costs, making the implementation of these concepts cost effective. Even while progress continues at a rapid clip, device designers still struggle with continuing problems -- how to

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1978 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

The New and the Not So New

Matthew F. Slana Bell Telephone Laboratories, Inc.

Gregg G. Dumas

Fairchild Micro Systems

Memory updating was one theme of the sixth annual workshop of the IEEE Computer Society's Technical Committee on Computer Elements, held last June in Vail, Colorado. As is traditional with many Computer Society workshops, this report is a collection of unattributed comments from individual workshop attendees whose anonymity was preserved in order to encourage a candid exchange of points of view.

Memory technology today constitutes a mix of both the new and the not so new. Semiconductor RAM, introduced in 1970, is taking more of the market, but core memory -- a technology that is over 20 years old -- is projected to hold constant at least through 1980. CCD, introduced commercially in 1975, may go to 250Kbit chips at less than 10 millicents/ bit in this period and may capture a small portion of the disk market by 1985. Meanwhile disks, which have been around since 1956, retain a large share of the bulk market in the face of the new technologies.

By the same token, the basic concepts in word processing, distributed files, and digital communications that promise to revolutionize information handling in business are not very new either. What is new is the continuing decline in semiconductor costs, making the implementation of these concepts cost effective. Even while progress continues at a rapid clip, device designers still struggle with continuing problems -- how to

test ever larger chips, how to scale up their size successfully.

Accompanying the price declines is the never-ending task of finding new markets, as well as the need for new devices to penetrate these markets. The microprocessor as a controller of consumer products offers a series of such large- productionoriented markets.

On the "new" side is gallium arsenide, a semiconductor material with much to offer in gigabit- computing applications. But it has disadvantages, too, and the "conventional" materials, such as SOS, are still in the game.

Again, it has become commonplace to note that the changing ratio of costs is affecting the tradeoffs in system architecture. Still new, however, is the great amount of work necessary to figure it all out!

Memory update

Although semiconductor memories have captured a significant market,

with installed random access memories estimated at somewhere between 500 x 109 and 10'2 bits, other forms of memory refuse to take a back seat, as represented by currently available disk capacity of 10'5 bits.

IEEE Compute...