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Standards for Microprocessors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131287D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 3 page(s) / 18K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Robert G. Stewart: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The rapid acceptance of microprocessors for sophisticated control and computation has focused attention on the need for microprocessor standards. One positive response to this problem has been the creation of the IEEE Computer Society's Microprocessor Standards Committee in August 1977. Operating under the aegis of the Computer Standards Committee, the committee is aimed at developing software and hardware standards for microprocessors and related equipment. The tasks initially undertaken were selected primarily on the basis of urgency. In the software standards area, the topics are microprocessor instruction sets and mnemonics. relocatable code format, and floating point format. The main initial hardware issue is the standardization of the existing de facto busses: Intel's Multibus, National's Microbus. and the S-100 Bus.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1978 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Standards for Microprocessors

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Robert G. Stewart

Stewart Research Enterprises

The rapid acceptance of microprocessors for sophisticated control and computation has focused attention on the need for microprocessor standards. One positive response to this problem has been the creation of the IEEE Computer Society's Microprocessor Standards Committee in August 1977. Operating under the aegis of the Computer Standards Committee, the committee is aimed at developing software and hardware standards for microprocessors and related equipment.

The tasks initially undertaken were selected primarily on the basis of urgency. In the software standards area, the topics are microprocessor instruction sets and mnemonics. relocatable code format, and floating point format. The main initial hardware issue is the standardization of the existing de facto busses: Intel's Multibus, National's Microbus. and the S-100 Bus.

Software Issues

The software tasks are being studied by a subcommittee chaired by Tom Pittman, a microprocessor software con sultant. (Tom is also acting as the representative of the Homebrew Computer Club.) An initial draft of a proposed microprocessor instruction set and mnemonics has been prepared by Wayne Fischer of Kaiser Electronics. The draft proposes the rule that instructions be named consistently by one convention (insofar as possible). namely:

(Image Omitted: Instruction.....Operands Verb.....Direct Indirect Object Object or or Source Destination)

which corresponds to the normal word order in the English language. For example. we say: "Put the bread on the table," rather than "Put on the table the bread . "

The widespread use of microprocessors to accomplish tasks formerly done with T2L logic has meant that programming in assembly-language code must be done by a much larger number of persons than previously required. Many computer hobbyists are working at this level. By standardizing instruction sets (to the extent permitted by architecture) and mnemonics, we can

IEEE Computer Society, Mar 01, 1978 Page 1 IEEE Computer Vo...