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SPECIAL FEATURE: Component Progress: Its Effect on High- Speed Computer Architecture and Machine Organization

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131297D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 18 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Erich Bloch: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Anyone concerned with understanding the past, present, and future of high-speed computing must of necessity focus on progress in the components field. He must formulate searching questions about the outlook of that technology and how it affects progress in high-speed computer development.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1978 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

SPECIAL FEATURE: Component Progress: Its Effect on High- Speed Computer Architecture and Machine Organization

Erich Bloch and Dom Galage

IBM

Anyone concerned with understanding the past, present, and future of high-speed computing must of necessity focus on progress in the components field. He must formulate searching questions about the outlook of that technology and how it affects progress in high-speed computer development.

Reshaping factors.

One would like to understand the limits to the performance, cost, and reliability improvements in semiconductor components, as well as past vs. future rates of technological progress. One would like to understand the dynamic forces driving this progress. These forces will influence the direction that developments will take, leading to considerations that will inevitably reshape both industries:

New capabilities in components can lead to new approaches in systems architecture and machine design.

The development of new and improved memory and storage hierarchies will be tied to developments in semiconductors and components. It is important to understand the potential results in view of capitalization and manpower requirements.

Finally, in the past, progress in semiconductor components was driven by the need for highperformance computing systems. Progress today is equally driven by the capability for creating complex packets of logic at low cost. This development, in its most interesting form, is the cause for a proliferation of microprocessor and low-cost memory devices. How the availability of these devices will affect the high-performance computer area is of paramount interest. Related to this development is the role of distributed processing.

It is clear, looking back, that progress in component performance, size, cost, and reliability has been reflected in corresponding improvements in systems. Looking forward then, an analysis of coming developments in logic and memory components appears to be one approach to forecasting future system characteristics. Prediction at the system level, however, is complicated by various options in machine organization, such as parallel processing and pipelining, which interact with component features to establish the performance limits of the system.

Progress in component technology

Over the 25-year growth period, component technology has progressed from vacuum tubes to largescale integration. The impetus has been provided by the advances made in semiconductor technology, as well as advances in circuit-design and packagingrelated areas....