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Workshop Report: Putting a Maturing Technology to Work

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131316D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 4 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

William Rosenbluth: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A cybernetic system model helped focus discussions of peripherals, development tools, debugging, and multiprocessing -- all in relation to microprocessor applications. lye Computer Elements Committee hosted 57 attendees at the Golden Hills Resort, Mesa, Arizona to conduct its Seventh Annual Workshop on Microelectronic Components. These workshops are conducted on an informal basis to allow maximum technical interchange between attendees from system houses, component houses, application houses, the academic world, and the world of personal computing. This year, the workshop concentrated on the theme of ";Putting a Maturing Microelectronic Technology to Work."; In his keynote speech, Ed Klingman (Cybernetic Micro Systems) concentrated on single-chip computers and peripheral controllers as ";orthogonal structures which allow a practical means for expanding processing powers within a given family of components."; Machine versus human interfaces for both parallel and serial architectures were discussed with respect to acquiring, processing, and outputting of data. Klingman further illustrated his model of the ";cybernetic system"; by task-group analogies drawn from one of the more highly organized insect societies -- weaver ants. The cybernetic system model helped focus the six succeeding sessions of the workshop toward a unified and cost-effective end-product objective.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1978 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Workshop Report: Putting a Maturing Technology to Work

William Rosenbluth

IBM

A cybernetic system model helped focus discussions of peripherals, development tools, debugging, and multiprocessing -- all in relation to microprocessor applications.

lye Computer Elements Committee hosted 57 attendees at the Golden Hills Resort, Mesa, Arizona to conduct its Seventh Annual Workshop on Microelectronic Components. These workshops are conducted on an informal basis to allow maximum technical interchange between attendees from system houses, component houses, application houses, the academic world, and the world of personal computing. This year, the workshop concentrated on the theme of "Putting a Maturing Microelectronic Technology to Work."

In his keynote speech, Ed Klingman (Cybernetic Micro Systems) concentrated on single-chip computers and peripheral controllers as "orthogonal structures which allow a practical means for expanding processing powers within a given family of components." Machine versus human interfaces for both parallel and serial architectures were discussed with respect to acquiring, processing, and outputting of data. Klingman further illustrated his model of the "cybernetic system" by task-group analogies drawn from one of the more highly organized insect societies -- weaver ants. The cybernetic system model helped focus the six succeeding sessions of the workshop toward a unified and cost-effective end-product objective.

Our first session, chaired by Howard Raphael (National SemiconductorI, explored the evolution and

- application of peripheral microcomportents. Ken McKenzie (Zilog) pro - jected continued growth in function and complexity. He proposed a natural separation of control, I/O intermediate data, and memory data buses, eventually leading to the re - quirement for separate control pro ; cessors in more advanced systems (perhaps borrowing a bit from IBM 360 architecture). McKenzie's complete thoughts are expressed later in this issue in his paper, "The Evolu tion of Peripheral Devices in Microprocessor Systems." R. Gabrielson (GE) provided a user's view of periphoral component application -- especialIy as applied to high-reliability guidance and control systems. Bill Wray (Motorola) explored the efficient use of peripheral components in system applications, and finally, George Reyling (National Semiconductor) illuminated the growing ease of system configuration through the use of purchased PROMs and programmable interface devices.

Tudor Finch (Bell Telephone Laboratories) chaired our second...