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An LSI Modular Direct-Execution Computer Organization

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131333D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 10 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Yaohan Chu: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

[Figure containing following caption omitted: A potentially low-cost architecture offers both device and linguistic modularity and executes high-level code without compilation.] When von Neumann designed the first stored-program computer in the early 1950's,' he intended it for the numerical solution of trajectory equations. Since numerical solution can be specified by a sequence of arithmetic operations, instruction sets evolved which represented the language of the machine. Since then, computer applications have grown tremendously and instruction sets have been expanded. However, the mode of specifying details step by step at the register and memory transfer level has not changed. This mode of programming has made even the use of assembly language a tedious task fraught with errors. The first commercially available high-level programming language, Fortran, became available during the mid 1950's. Fortran has made a great contribution in enabling more people to use computers, even though there have been many competing versions of-this language in the course of its evolution. Another high-level programming language, Algol- 60,2 was announced in 1960; this was an internationally conceived and designed high-level language with a great number of new language constructs. The introduction of the Burroughs B5500 computer systems in the early 1960's represented a great stride forward in computer architecture, since this system was specifically designed for Extended Algol, a dialect of Algol-60. Although the B5500 is a high- level language computer, it is classified as an indirect- execution architecture4 because the Extended Algol was first translated into an intermediate language /which Burroughs claimed the programmers did not need to know) by a software compiler, which in turn was executed by the hardware. One could speculate that adoption of this indirect-execution architecture was in part influenced by the compiler art, and in part compelled by the hardware technology of the early 1960's.

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This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1978 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

An LSI Modular Direct-Execution Computer Organization

Yaohan Chu

University of Maryland

(Image Omitted: A potentially low-cost architecture offers both device and linguistic modularity and executes high-level code without compilation.)

When von Neumann designed the first stored-program computer in the early 1950's,' he intended it for the numerical solution of trajectory equations. Since numerical solution can be specified by a sequence of arithmetic operations, instruction sets evolved which represented the language of the machine. Since then, computer applications have grown tremendously and instruction sets have been expanded. However, the mode of specifying details step by step at the register and memory transfer level has not changed. This mode of programming has made even the use of assembly language a tedious task fraught with errors.

The first commercially available high-level programming language, Fortran, became available during the mid 1950's. Fortran has made a great contribution in enabling more people to use computers, even though there have been many competing versions of-this language in the course of its evolution. Another high-level programming language, Algol- 60,2 was announced in 1960; this was an internationally conceived and designed high-level language with a great number of new language constructs. The introduction of the Burroughs B5500 computer systems in the early 1960's represented a great stride forward in computer architecture, since this system was specifically designed for Extended Algol, a dialect of Algol-60. Although the B5500 is a high- level language computer, it is classified as an indirect- execution architecture4 because the Extended Algol was first translated into an intermediate language /which Burroughs claimed the programmers did not need to know) by a software compiler, which in turn was executed by the hardware. One could speculate that adoption of this indirect-execution architecture

was in part influenced by the compiler art, and in part compelled by the hardware technology of the early 1960's.

Direct-execution architecture.

This architecture is language directed;5-7 it can accept a high-level program and execute it directly. It is direct because it neither compiles nor assembles, nor utilizes a relocatable or absolute code. The high-level program is the only program, and the high-level programming language is the only machine language.

Direct-execution architecture was proposed by Anderson for the Algol-60 languages This proposal was probably the first direct-exe...