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Cellular-Logic Devices: Concepts and Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131376D
Original Publication Date: 1979-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 19 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Stanley Y. W. Su: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

[Figure containing following caption omitted: Cellular-logic devices, using a parallel processing element for each element of a rotating memory, allow fast data search and manipulation.] Traditional secondary memory devices have very limited processing capabilities. Data stored in these devices must be moved into main memory before being examined. Moving data between main memory and secondary storage often degrades the performance of the entire system. Celluar-logic devices alleviate this problem by building more processing capability into a rotating memory device so that data can be searched and processed in secondary storage and irrelevant data can be filtered out by the logic associated with each rotating memory element. Processing efficiency is gained in these devices by parallel processing of the data in all the memory elements and by content and context addressing of the data. This paper describes /1) the operation and limitations of the conventional rotating memory devices, (2) the architecture and general characteristics of cellular-logic devices, /3) some existing cellular-logic devices and their applications in keyword retrieval, character string processing, and data base management, and /4) the limitations, issues, and problems related to these devices.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1979 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Cellular-Logic Devices: Concepts and Applications

Stanley Y. W. Su

University of Florida

(Image Omitted: Cellular-logic devices, using a parallel processing element for each element of a rotating memory, allow fast data search and manipulation.)

Traditional secondary memory devices have very limited processing capabilities. Data stored in these devices must be moved into main memory before being examined. Moving data between main memory and secondary storage often degrades the performance of the entire system. Celluar-logic devices alleviate this problem by building more processing capability into a rotating memory device so that data can be searched and processed in secondary storage and irrelevant data can be filtered out by the logic associated with each rotating memory element. Processing efficiency is gained in these devices by parallel processing of the data in all the memory elements and by content and context addressing of the data. This paper describes /1) the operation and limitations of the conventional rotating memory devices, (2) the architecture and general characteristics of cellular-logic devices, /3) some existing cellular-logic devices and their applications in keyword retrieval, character string processing, and data base management, and /4) the limitations, issues, and problems related to these devices.

Conventional rotating memory devices -- features and limitations

The cost and technical problems in developing a high-speed, large-capacity main memory force most existing computer systems to use a variety of slower but less expensive secondary storage devices to store data and programs. Among these devices magnetic disks, which have come into wide use, provide low access time, highspeed data transfer, and direct access capability. Their operating characteristics illustrate the limitations of the conventional rotating memory devices -- which motivated the design and development of the cellular-logic devices described in this paper.

Magnetic disks.

A magnetic disk is a metal platter having one or both sides coated with ferromagnetic particles that provide a data storage medium. A number of these metal platters can be stacked on top of each other to form a disk pack. The surface of each platter is divided into concentric bands called tracks, the latter being further divided into blocks of storage area called sectors. Sectors are addressable storage units with the same capacity for recording data. Data are written into or read from a sector through a read/write head that floats above or below the...