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Technology Architecture for Data Management: An Overview and Perspective

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131389D
Original Publication Date: 1979-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 4 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Harut Barsarnian: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

[Figure containing following caption omitted: Rapid growth of data bases in end-user applications and as powerful software development tools will make data management systems one of the greatest challenges of the 1980's and a landmark of that decade.] The technology of electronic computing is nearly 40 years young. Industry analysts tend to describe computer evolution in terms of ";generations,"; each characterized by the predominant hardware technology used for logic -- tubes, transistors, or ICs. Such characterization is superficial and reflects a narrow point of view. It does not depict the more substantive technological breakthroughs that have contributed to the spectacular growth of the computer industry. The 1940's were the pioneering years; scientific foundations and original architectural concepts were established. Although the discoveries and achievements of any one period have been advanced and expanded in subsequent years, each past decade (not necessarily at discrete calendar boundaries} has added a new dimension to the genealogy of the computer. During the 1950's the engineering and manufacturing feasibility of computers was proven and their commercial viability was established. The era of the computer ";family"; and contemporary operating systems began in the 1960's. The 70's became the decade of computer communications, signified by the rapid expansion of remote computing, distributed processing, and computer networks. And the 1980's? An extrapolation of computing's evolutionary path, based on today's realities -- the rapid growth of data bases in end-user applications and as powerful tools for software development -- indicates that the development of efficient data management systems will be one of the 80's greatest challenges as well as a landmark of that decade. Data management systems are quite complex in nature, and problem solutiana tend to cross the boundaries of various disciplines. Technology, storage hierarchies, architecture, and data defini tion and manipulation languages are intimately related to the design and performance of data management systems. The need for further exploration of this interdisciplinary synergism set the topical framework for the 17th Lake Arrowhead Workshop on Data Management and Storage Hierarchies, held in September 1978 and sponsored by the Western Area Committee of the IEEE Computer Society. The authors contributing to this special issue were key participants in that workshop.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1979 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Technology Architecture for Data Management: An Overview and Perspective

Guest Editor's Introduction

Harut Barsarnian

Sperry Univac

(Image Omitted: Rapid growth of data bases in end-user applications and as powerful software development tools will make data management systems one of the greatest challenges of the 1980's and a landmark of that decade.)

The technology of electronic computing is nearly 40 years young. Industry analysts tend to describe computer evolution in terms of "generations," each characterized by the predominant hardware technology used for logic -- tubes, transistors, or ICs. Such characterization is superficial and reflects a narrow point of view. It does not depict the more substantive technological breakthroughs that have contributed to the spectacular growth of the computer industry.

The 1940's were the pioneering years; scientific foundations and original architectural concepts were established. Although the discoveries and achievements of any one period have been advanced and expanded in subsequent years, each past decade (not necessarily at discrete calendar boundaries} has added a new dimension to the genealogy of the computer. During the 1950's the engineering and manufacturing feasibility of computers was proven and their commercial viability was established. The era of the computer "family" and contemporary operating systems began in the 1960's. The 70's became the decade of computer communications, signified by the rapid expansion of remote computing, distributed processing, and computer networks. And the 1980's? An extrapolation of computing's evolutionary path, based on today's realities -- the rapid growth of data bases in end-user applications and as powerful tools for software development -- indicates that the development of efficient data management systems will be one of the 80's greatest challenges as well as a landmark of that decade.

Data management systems are quite complex in nature, and problem solutiana tend to cross the boundaries of various disciplines. Technology, storage hierarchies, architecture, and data defini tion and manipulation languages are intimately related to the design and performance of data management systems. The need for further exploration of this interdisciplinary synergism set the topical framework for the 17th Lake Arrowhead Workshop on Data Management and Storage Hierarchies, held in September 1978 and sponsored by the Western Area Committee of the IEEE Computer Society. The authors contributing to this special issue were key participants in...