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Browse Prior Art Database

Current Trends in Data Base Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131392D
Original Publication Date: 1979-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 24 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

G. A. Champine: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

[Figure containing following caption omitted: Tomorrow's data base systems will be organized around a common architecture, data distribution techniques, and new specialized processors.] The current status of data base systems can be characterized by two significant trends: rapidly increasing user acceptance, and rapidly improving technology at the logical, physical, and architectural levels. These two trends are closely coupled. Increased user acceptance has come about, in part, because the price of direct access mass storage has fallen by a factor of ten in the last eight years and is currently falling by a factor of two every 30-36 months. The availability of low-cost direct access mass storage has encouraged users to move away from tape-oriented sequential files into structures that support direct access efficiently. A recent survey has indicated that about half of the medium and large systems now being procured will have data base applications. Conversely, the large market for data base systems has spurred research and development to provide increasingly better technology. Of course, fundamental to this ";positive feedback"; situation are the basic value of data base systems to the end user and the absence of substantive barriers to further technological improvement. Even though the overall cost/performance of systems is improving by a factor of two every 4-5 years in current dollars, the needs of computer users are growing even more rapidly. This trend is leading to considerable interest in computer architectures that are more efficient in information storage and retrieval applications. E ssentially all of the architectural design activity in information storage and retrieval is directed at data base systems. Data base systems were developed to overcome a number of shortcomings in existing file management systems. Advantages of data base systems can be listed as follows:

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1979 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Current Trends in Data Base Systems

G. A. Champine Sperry Univac

(Image Omitted: Tomorrow's data base systems will be organized around a common architecture, data distribution techniques, and new specialized processors.)

The current status of data base systems can be characterized by two significant trends: rapidly increasing user acceptance, and rapidly improving technology at the logical, physical, and architectural levels. These two trends are closely coupled. Increased user acceptance has come about, in part, because the price of direct access mass storage has fallen by a factor of ten in the last eight years and is currently falling by a factor of two every 30-36 months. The availability of low-cost direct access mass storage has encouraged users to move away from tape-oriented sequential files into structures that support direct access efficiently. A recent survey has indicated that about half of the medium and large systems now being procured will have data base applications.

Conversely, the large market for data base systems has spurred research and development to provide increasingly better technology. Of course, fundamental to this "positive feedback" situation are the basic value of data base systems to the end user and the absence of substantive barriers to further technological improvement.

Even though the overall cost/performance of systems is improving by a factor of two every 4-5 years in current dollars, the needs of computer users are growing even more rapidly. This trend is leading to considerable interest in computer architectures that are more efficient in information storage and retrieval applications. E ssentially all of the architectural design activity in information storage and retrieval is directed at data base systems. Data base systems were developed to overcome a number of shortcomings in existing file management systems. Advantages of data base systems can be listed as follows:

Storage design is independent of specific applications.

Explicit data definition is independent of application programs.

Users need not know data formats or physical storage structures.

Integrity assurance is independent of application programs.

Recovery is independent of application programs.

Keeping a single copy of the data eliminates the redundancy and inconsistency of multiple files.

Although a number of approaches to data base systems exist, three data models appear to be gaining dominance: the network model, as specified in the Codasyl data design language and Journal of Development; the relational mo...