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SPECIAL FEATURE: Microcomputer Applications in Japan

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131396D
Original Publication Date: 1979-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 12 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Ryoichi Mori: AUTHOR [+11]

Abstract

I n 1978, several working groups in two specialized committees of JEIDA, the Japan Electronic Industries Development Association, reviewed the applications of microcomputers in Japan as of the end of 1977. (JEIDA is a nonprofit organization established by Japanese law and supported by the electronics industry.) We published the findings as the ";Microcomputer Survey Report"; of the Microcomputer Committee of JEIDA.' This article is a summary of that report. The abstract of a similar survey taken a year earlier can be found elsewhere.2

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 12% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1979 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

SPECIAL FEATURE: Microcomputer Applications in Japan

Ryoichi Mori

University of Tsukaba

Kiyoto Ohkawa Mitsubishi Electric Co.

Yuzo Kita Hitachi, Ltd.

Seishi Nishikawa

Nippon Telegraph and Telephone

Iwao Morishita

University of Tokyo

Akio Tojo , Akio Kobubu , Yoshikuni Okada , Shunichi Uchida

Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tokyo

I n 1978, several working groups in two specialized committees of JEIDA, the Japan Electronic Industries Development Association, reviewed the applications of microcomputers in Japan as of the end of 1977. (JEIDA is a nonprofit organization established by Japanese law and supported by the electronics industry.) We published the findings as the "Microcomputer Survey Report" of the Microcomputer Committee of JEIDA.' This article is a summary of that report. The abstract of a similar survey taken a year earlier can be found elsewhere.2

For an observer outside Japanese industry, perhaps the most striking aspect of the microcomputer applications area is its scope: We studied various uses of about 790 microcomputer systems by means of detailed questionnaires, and found 1290 applications (Figure 1). What's more, new microcomputer applications in a wide range of fields are still emerging rapidly.

Three fields -- industrial, computer, and instrumentation -- account for over two-thirds of the applications. In Figure 2, the ratios of products in these fields are classified according to first delivery and show the recent increase in consumer and computer areas. For these purposes, our statistics are derived not on the basis of economic value or product volume, but on the basis of individual product types, unless otherwise noted. This means that products are counted with equal weight whether produced in large or small quantities.

(Image Omitted: Figure 1. Application fields.)

(Image Omitted: Figure 2. Application fields and first delivery.)

Microcomputers: architecture and application

IEEE Computer Society, May 01, 1979 Page 1 IEEE Computer Volume 12 Number 5, Pages 64-67

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SPECIAL FEATURE: Microcomputer Applications in Japan

The word lengths of the microcomputers studied appear in Figure 3; 72 percent are 8-bit processors. The proportion of 16-bit processors and bit-slice pro cessors is higher in the communications, computer, and transportation categories, where high performance is especially needed.

Figure 4 shows what the microcomputers are replacing. New applications occupy about half, and 61 percent of these are in instrumentation. Replacement of minicomputers is important, with 24 perce...