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Interactive Computer Graphics: Flying High -- Part 1

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131413D
Original Publication Date: 1979-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-10
Document File: 11 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Ware Myers: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

[Figure containing following caption omitted: The growth of computer graphics is remarkable even by computer industry standards. This first of a two- part article views some of the latest hardware available from leading graphics manufacturers.] Computer graphics has taken off. That, at least, seemed to be the consensus view of readers of the article ";Computer Graphics -- Poised for Takeoff"; which appeared in the January 1978 Computer. Reinforcing this opinion are the estimates of such market research firms as Frost and Sullivan of New York and Creative Strategies International of San Jose. According to F&S, there are 163 graphics suppliers in business today.l Creative Strategies estimates that computer graphics is a half- billion dollar industry with a 25-percent growth rated Speaking at a recent Frost & Sullivan seminar in New York, consultant Carl Machover estimated the installed base of graphics terminals through 1978 at 50,000 units -- 70 percent of them in this country. According to Machover, at least a dozen suppliers do $10 million or more per year -- whereas a decade ago no supplier exceeded that volume.3

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1979 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Interactive Computer Graphics: Flying High -- Part 1

Ware Myers

Computer Staff

(Image Omitted: The growth of computer graphics is remarkable even by computer industry standards. This first of a two- part article views some of the latest hardware available from leading graphics manufacturers.)

Computer graphics has taken off. That, at least, seemed to be the consensus view of readers of the article "Computer Graphics -- Poised for Takeoff" which appeared in the January 1978 Computer. Reinforcing this opinion are the estimates of such market research firms as Frost and Sullivan of New York and Creative Strategies International of San Jose. According to F&S, there are 163 graphics suppliers in business today.l Creative Strategies estimates that computer graphics is a half- billion dollar industry with a 25-percent growth rated Speaking at a recent Frost & Sullivan seminar in New York, consultant Carl Machover estimated the installed base of graphics terminals through 1978 at 50,000 units -- 70 percent of them in this country. According to Machover, at least a dozen suppliers do $10 million or more per year -- whereas a decade ago no supplier exceeded that volume.3

Supporting this point of view was the attendance at the Fifth Annual Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques (SIGGRAPH '78) -- substantially up over prior years, as shown in Table 1. By the end of the conference vendors had committed for double the amount of floor space at SIGGRAPH '79, which will be held next month, August 8-iO, in Chicago at the Hyatt Regency O'Hare Hotel and the adjoining Exposition Center.

  (Image Omitted: Table 1. Siggraph's rapidly growing attendance tiguras support the belief that the computer graphics field is taking oft. .....SIGGRAPH.....NUMBER REGISTERED^.....NO. OF BOOTHS Philadelphia 76.....350.....10 San Jose 77.....750.....44 Atlanta 78.....1100
Conference.....90 450 Tutorials Does not include me thousands (in 1978) who visited me
exhibits only and did not register for the conference.)

Behind the graphic display is a model

In many applications of interactive computer graphics, "what you see is what you get. " The display itself, or a hard copy, is essentially the end product in animation, art, cartography, and data plotting. Of course, the display is represented in the computer and its memory by some kind of model. But if the display itself is the purpose, the model need not be geometrically precise. Who cares how big Mickey Mouse's ears are, where they attach to his scalp, or what the tolerance between ears...