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Computer Network Protocols: A Hierarchical Viewpoint

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131442D
Original Publication Date: 1979-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-11
Document File: 4 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

G. Michael Schneider: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

[Figure containing following caption omitted: Progress in network protocol design brings us closer to fully-supported public data networks. These networks willprovide message switching and computing services to a national user community.] The field of computer networks, once simply a research topic, has now evolved into a widely recognized and widely used architectural strategy for supporting a range of end- user applications. The wellknown star network topology has been used since the early 1960's to provide remote access to computing resources. The more complex (and more interesting) resource sharing network structures have evolved significantly since their beginning in the late 1960's and early 70's. The earliest resource-sharing networks, such as the Arpanet (about 1967), KIN (1971), Cyclades (1973), and RCP (1974), were primarily esperimental prototypes providing a relatively unstable test bed for research into network design and utilization. Today, however, there is literally an explosion of work on developing fully supported public data networks to provide both message switching and computing services to a national user community. The field has matured in the last 5-10 years. Table 1 lists just some of these national network projects, either existing or planned. Roberts offers an excellent survey of the growth of resource sharing networks.] [Figure containing following caption omitted: Table 1. Sample national network projects. NETWORK.....COUNTRY.....APPROXIMATE DATE TELENET.....US.....1975 EPSS...... UK.....1977 DATAPAC.....CANADA.....1977 TYMNET.....US.....1977 TRANSPAC.....FRANCE.....1978.....a, DX-2.....JAPAN.....1979 EURONET.....EUROPEAN COMMON MARKET.....1979 ] One of the primary reasons for the rapid growth of networking is the greater understanding of how to best organize, design, and implement the protocols necessary to support efficient network operation. A protocol is simply the set of mutually agreed upon conventions for handling the exchange of information between computing ";elements."; These elements may be circuits, modems, terminals, concentrators, hosts, processes, or people. Initially, almost all protocols were designed in an ad hoc fashion -- they were application- specific and were usually structured as a single-level, monolithic process which performed all network operations from lowest to highest. This approach had the limited virtue of simplicity of implementation.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1979 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Computer Network Protocols: A Hierarchical Viewpoint

Guest Editor's Introduction

G. Michael Schneider

University of Minnesota

(Image Omitted: Progress in network protocol design brings us closer to fully-supported public data networks. These networks willprovide message switching and computing services to a national user community.)

The field of computer networks, once simply a research topic, has now evolved into a widely recognized and widely used architectural strategy for supporting a range of end- user applications. The wellknown star network topology has been used since the early 1960's to provide remote access to computing resources. The more complex (and more interesting) resource sharing network structures have evolved significantly since their beginning in the late 1960's and early 70's. The earliest resource-sharing networks, such as the Arpanet (about 1967), KIN (1971), Cyclades (1973), and RCP (1974), were primarily esperimental prototypes providing a relatively unstable test bed for research into network design and utilization. Today, however, there is literally an explosion of work on developing fully supported public data networks to provide both message switching and computing services to a national user community. The field has matured in the last 5-10 years. Table 1 lists just some of these national network projects, either existing or planned. Roberts offers an excellent survey of the growth of resource sharing networks.]

(Image Omitted: Table 1. Sample national network projects.

  NETWORK.....COUNTRY.....APPROXIMATE DATE TELENET.....US.....1975 EPSS...... UK.....1977 DATAPAC.....CANADA.....1977 TYMNET.....US.....1977
TRANSPAC.....FRANCE.....1978.....a, DX-2.....JAPAN.....1979 EURONET.....EUROPEAN

COMMON MARKET.....1979)

One of the primary reasons for the rapid growth of networking is the greater understanding of how to best organize, design, and implement the protocols necessary to support efficient network operation.

A protocol is simply the set of mutually agreed upon conventions for handling the exchange of information between computing "elements." These elements may be circuits, modems, terminals, concentrators, hosts, processes, or people. Initially, almost all protocols were designed in an ad hoc fashion -- they were application- specific and were usually structured as a single-level, monolithic process which performed all network operations from lowest to highest. This approach had the limited virtue of simplicity of implementation.

However, all recent protocol work has been moving in the...