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SPECIAL FEATURE: Innovation at Texas Instruments

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131448D
Original Publication Date: 1979-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-11
Document File: 14 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Mark Shepherd, Jr.: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Technical Editor's Note: Perhaps the computer industry's most valuable resource is the creativity of its people. Yet what happens to most innovatzue ideas? How is creativity managed? How is innovation encouraged?

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 8% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1979 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

SPECIAL FEATURE: Innovation at Texas Instruments

Mark Shepherd, Jr. and J. Fred Bucy

Texas Instruments

Technical Editor's Note:

Perhaps the computer industry's most valuable resource is the creativity of its people. Yet what happens to most innovatzue ideas? How is creativity managed? How is innovation encouraged?

Texas Instruments has a strong history of innovation. This article describes how TI manages and encourages innovation. The authors are justifiably proud of the result in their company. We will welcome articles from other companies with unique perspectives on the management of creativity.

Portia Isaacson

Innovation at Texas Instruments must be considered in the context of the philosophies that guide the management of the company, and of the way in which it is organized. To quote early leaders and former chairmen of TI,

"In 1946, together we determined we wanted to accomplish two things. One, to be on the leading edge of technology, and second, to build not only a big company, but the best company in our field."

J. Erik Jonsson

"By late 1951, it was clear that, in spite of excellent performance, there were even larger opportunities for growth. It was during these years that we decided not to be satisfied with being a good small- to medium-sized company, but to become a good big company. To meet that goal and present a challenge to our many illustrious competitors, it became important that we improve our research and development efforts and enter into broader and even more challenging product lines."

Patrick E. Haggerty

Fundamental to these philosophies is motivation of individuals to become involved in the successful and profitable growth of the corporation. One of the most basic factors is the achievement of a clear understanding, at every level of the organization, of our reason for existence. TI's statement of that reason, which stresses innovation as the means by which~we will achieve full effectiveness, is set down in the Preamble to our Corporate Objective:

"Texas Instruments exists to create, make, and market useful products and services to satisfy the needs of our customers throughout the world. Because economic wealth is essential to the development of our society, we measure ourselves by the extent to which we contribute to that economic wealth -- as expressed by sales growth and asset return. We believe our

IEEE Computer Society, Sep 01, 1979 Page 1 IEEE Computer Volume 12 Number 9, Pages 82-85

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SPECIAL FEATURE: Innovation at Texas Instruments

effectiveness in serving our customers...