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The Ada Language System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131467D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-11
Document File: 14 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Martin I. Wolfe: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

The ALS-a portable, retargetable, integrated environment-is being designed to meet rigorous Stoneman requirements. It addresses critical development and maintenance problems of embedded computer systems. The work described in this article is being performed under US Army CECOM Contract No. DAAK80~80-C 0507. The development of an Ada programming support environment by the US Army CECOM is the culmination of a five-year effort by the US Department of Defense to design a modern high-order programming language and associated support environment for use in embedded computer applications. This development is one of the two DoD-sponsored Ada systems. This effort began in 1975 with the development of the Strawman document, an initial set of specifications that was widely circulated and reviewed by government institutions, universities, and industrial organizations. The draft specification was revised several times on the basis of comments received from reviewers. It evolved into the Woodenman document' and, by June 1976, into the Tinman document.2

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1981 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

The Ada Language System

Martin I. Wolfe US Army CORADCOM Wayne Babich Richard Simpson, Richard Thall, and Larry Weissman SofTech, Inc.

The ALS-a portable, retargetable, integrated environment-is being designed to meet rigorous Stoneman requirements. It addresses critical development and maintenance problems of embedded computer systems.

The work described in this article is being performed under US Army CECOM Contract No. DAAK80~80-C 0507.

The development of an Ada programming support environment by the US Army CECOM is the culmination of a five-year effort by the US Department of Defense to design a modern high- order programming language and associated support environment for use in embedded computer applications. This development is one of the two DoD-sponsored Ada systems. This effort began in 1975 with the development of the Strawman document, an initial set of specifications that was widely circulated and reviewed by government institutions, universities, and industrial organizations. The draft specification was revised several times on the basis of comments received from reviewers. It evolved into the Woodenman document' and, by June 1976, into the Tinman document.2

Existing languages such as Algol 68, Pascal, PL/I, Jovial, CMS-2, and Tacpol were evaluated with respect to the Tinman requirements; none met them. An economic analysis showed that a suitably supported language could save the DoD billions of dollars through lower personnel training costs and greater use of software tools and packages.3 4 In view of this, the DoD decided to proceed with the design of a new high-order programming language.

The Tinman document was refined into the Ironman document,5 and in August 1977 four contracts were awarded for competitive language designs. The designs were delivered in February 1978 and were widely circulated for review. Two of the designs were consequently refined, and the language requirements were revised to become the Steelman document. 6 In May 1979, one of the two competing designs was chosen as the DoD high-order programming language. The new language, published in June 1979, was named Ada in honor of the first programmer-Augusta Ada Byron, Countess of Lovelace.7'3 During the ensuing year, a concentrated evaluation of the language, performed by the DoD, industry, and academia, resulted in revisions to the initial Ada design.9

In addition, the DoD developed requirements for APSEs-Ada programming support environments. These requirements appeared at various levels of refinement in the Sandman, Pebbleman...