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Mass Storage Systems and Evolution of Data Center Architectures Guest Editor's Introduction

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131511D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-11
Document File: 7 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Stephen W. Miller: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The investment that an enterprise makes in data processing equipment was once concentrated in the data center. The architecture of that data center is now changing into what might better be called a collection of cooperating subsystems that encompasses the geographic extent of the enterprise. Via telephone lines, leased lines, concentrators, etc., remote terminals are connected to a front-end processor, which often permits access to one of several host processors at the data center. Inside the data center, the multiple hosts may be supplied by a single vendor, although processors representative of several vendors are becoming more common. If the data center itself does not contain multi-vendor hosts, the enterprise may well face a problem similar to having multiple data

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1982 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Mass Storage Systems and Evolution of Data Center Architectures Guest Editor's Introduction

Stephen W. Miller,

SRI International

The investment that an enterprise makes in data processing equipment was once concentrated in the data center. The architecture of that data center is now changing into what might better be called a collection of cooperating subsystems that encompasses the geographic extent of the enterprise. Via telephone lines, leased lines, concentrators, etc., remote terminals are connected to a front-end processor, which often permits access to one of several host processors at the data center. Inside the data center, the multiple hosts may be supplied by a single vendor, although processors representative of several vendors are becoming more common. If the data center itself does not contain multi-vendor hosts, the enterprise may well face a problem similar to having multiple data

centers, located in different areas, that have grown separately around products from a particular vendor. Sometimes the several vendors are represented for reasons that are lost in history, but the fact remains that users throughout an enterprise desire access to files and other services that are distributed over several host processors. Associated with these data centers is the need for a central data repository of some description, whether it is based in paper, microfilm, or magnetic tape.

The typical central data repository in the DP world is the magentic tape library. By "central repository" we mean the place from which data volumes are brought for entry into the system. The general paradigm is that the tape reel is fetched from the repository and mounted on a

drive. Then data are moved from the tape volumes tc secondary storage (i.e., disks) for processing. Of course once the reels are mounted some data are processes directly from magnetic tape because of the very shor' access time to the "next record." During the last three decades, considering the density of storage on the tape and the speed with which we move tape, tape technology has become only a few hundred times better. During that same period of time, considering the instructions executed per second and the increased power of an individual instruction, the host computer (i.e., the central processor and main memory) has increased in power several thousand times. This disparity in rate of improvement places great pressures on the system to "handle more tape faster. "

In handling more tape faster, many data center personnel must mount manually hundreds to thous...