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Rochester's Intelligent Gateway

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131539D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-11
Document File: 27 page(s) / 86K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Keith A. Blintz: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

This multiple-machine, multiple-network system predates most of the systems that resemble it and provides more facilities in a substantially more rnhPrPn' fnchinn The University of Rochester has had several years experience in the design and implementation of a multiple machine, multiple-network distributed system called RIG, or Rochester's Intelligent Gateway. RIG was designed as a state-of-the-art research computing environment to support a variety of distributed applications and research in distributed computing. Particular applications include computer image analysis and design automation for VLSI. Distributed systems research includes investigations into internetwork architectures, interprocess communication, naming, distributed file systems, distributed control, performance monitoring, exception handling, debugging, and user interfaces. RIG was designed for a collection of heterogeneous machines, interconnected by networks of varying characteristics. It represents one of the earliest and most comprehensive attempts at designing a distributed operating system and supporting network architecture from the ground up. Various aspects of the system have been presented in a number of papers. ~~~ The first half of this article will present a brief overview that is a slight idealization of the current implementation, described elsewhere,8 and differs in several significant ways from our original notions of the system goals and design.2 The last half will emphasize qualitative and quantitative experimental results.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1982 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Rochester's Intelligent Gateway

Keith A. Blintz Stanford University Klaus D. Gradischnig European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Jerome A. Feldman University of Rochester Richard F.Rashid Carnegie- Mellon University

This multiple-machine, multiple-network system predates most of the systems that resemble it and provides more facilities in a substantially more rnhPrPn' fnchinn

The University of Rochester has had several years experience in the design and implementation of a multiple machine, multiple-network distributed system called RIG, or Rochester's Intelligent Gateway. RIG was designed as a state-of-the-art research computing environment to support a variety of distributed applications and research in distributed computing. Particular applications include computer image analysis and design automation for VLSI. Distributed systems research includes investigations into internetwork architectures, interprocess communication, naming, distributed file systems, distributed control, performance monitoring, exception handling, debugging, and user interfaces.

RIG was designed for a collection of heterogeneous machines, interconnected by networks of varying characteristics. It represents one of the earliest and most comprehensive attempts at designing a distributed operating system and supporting network architecture from the ground up. Various aspects of the system have been presented in a number of papers. ~~~ The first half of this article will present a brief overview that is a slight idealization of the current implementation, described elsewhere,8 and differs in several significant ways from our original notions of the system goals and design.2 The last half will emphasize qualitative and quantitative experimental results.

RIG basics

Hardware.

The hardware environment consists of a number of local-net-based workstations connected to back- end file servers, databases, and large-scale computing resources. In particular, RIG interconnects three networks via a dual-processor gateway (see Figure I ). The bulk of the user's computational requirements are met by timesharing systems such as DEC-10/TOPS-10 and VAX/Unix, and personal computers such as Xerox Altos -- 16-bit minicomputers with 606x 808 framebuffer raster-scan displays. ~ ~ The Altos, gateway machines (Data General Eclipses), and VAX are connected via an Ethernet. ~ 2 The DEC- 10 (campus network) communicates with the gateway over 9600-baud asynchronous and 50-kHz synchronous lines. The gateway is connected to the Arpanet as a very distant host vi...