Browse Prior Art Database

Using Handwriting Action to Construct Models of Engineering Objects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131550D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-11
Document File: 14 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Mamoru Hosaka: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

With this symbol recognition technique, handwritten engineering drawings can be used as direct computer input for generating machine models of design objects.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 7% of the total text.

Page 1 of 14

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1982 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Using Handwriting Action to Construct Models of Engineering Objects

Mamoru Hosaka Tokyo Denki University Fumihiko Kimura University of Tokyo

With this symbol recognition technique, handwritten engineering drawings can be used as direct computer input for generating machine models of design objects.

Two-dimensional expressions of information are widely used in daily affairs because integrated concepts are easier to describe -- and understand -- when language is augmented by charts, diagrams, or mathematical expressions. Freehand writing on a sheet of paper with a pen or pencil is a natural, habitual way to express original ideas or images. Neither a typewriter nor a CRT display, although not without its own merits, allows the freedom of pencil and paper.

The remarkable progress, and consequent decrease in cost, of computer graphics hardware and software has led to the widespread use of two-dimensional expressions in computer output and their gradual implementation in the man-machine interface. So far as output is concerned, high-quality plots and displays are both practical and available. Input methods and descriptions, however, are still primitive, so one must endure the inconvenience of awkward input processes. This imbalance of input and output performance, especially if communication is through a graphics system, is the main obstacle to interactive man-machine activities.

Since producing and understanding two-dimensional expressions affects man's ability to create, memorize, and associate both mental and actual pictures, a oryedimensional language description requiring interpretive effort is unnatural and frequently produces imperfect results. Accordingly, direct computer input of twodimensional freehand expressions, made with or without simple apparatuses such as rulers, compasses, or templates, could greatly reduce the burden of translating graphical data into a computer language. If this can be accomplished, especially in cases that require extraction of a drawing's meaning before processing, the result will be broad, new applications for computer graphics.

Various problems must be solved before this idea becomes feasible. To obtain a clear understanding of the problems involved, we decided to treat engineering drawings, because they contain two-dimensional expressions, structures, and meanings that cannot be easily described by the usual computer languages. An engineering drawing can be looked upon as a model of an object that is meaningful only to someone who understands drawing rules and symbology well...