Browse Prior Art Database

SPECIAL FEATURE Lisp Machines Displayed at Al Conference

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131554D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-11
Document File: 7 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Ware Myers: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

";Because of the type of problems we work on, we encountered the limitations of machine architectures earlier than anyone else,"; David L. Waltz of the University of Illinois, program chairman, pointed out in an interview at the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence last August. Sponsored by the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, the meeting attracted more than 1500 participants to the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie-Mellon University for sessions on vision, natural languages and speech, problem solving and search, knowledge representation, robotics, cognitive modeling, and other subjects. This attendance represented an increase of 50 percent over last year's. The artificial intelligence community needed computers that were able to run very large programs on the time scale of interactive usage, and -- because certain concepts were reaching the point of practical application -- it needed computers at a price low enough to make these applications economically feasible. The key features required were a large virtual address space and the ability to process symbolic information. Symbolics, Inc., one of the vendors who offer machines with this capability, describes symbolic processing in terms of symbols and relationships. ";A symbol represents a real-world object and provides a place to store information about that object. Symbols and properties of symbols may be freely created and manipulated while the symbol processor worries about the details.";

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1982 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

SPECIAL FEATURE Lisp Machines Displayed at Al Conference

Ware Myers

Contributing Editor

"Because of the type of problems we work on, we encountered the limitations of machine architectures earlier than anyone else," David L. Waltz of the University of Illinois, program chairman, pointed out in an interview at the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence last August. Sponsored by the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, the meeting attracted more than 1500 participants to the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie-Mellon University for sessions on vision, natural languages and speech, problem solving and search, knowledge representation, robotics, cognitive modeling, and other subjects. This attendance represented an increase of 50 percent over last year's.

The artificial intelligence community needed computers that were able to run very large programs on the time scale of interactive usage, and -- because certain concepts were reaching the point of practical application -- it needed computers at a price low enough to make these applications economically feasible. The key features required were a large virtual address space and the ability to process symbolic information.

Symbolics, Inc., one of the vendors who offer machines with this capability, describes symbolic processing in terms of symbols and relationships. "A symbol represents a real-world object and provides a place to store information about that object. Symbols and properties of symbols may be freely created and manipulated while the symbol processor worries about the details."

(Image Omitted: Interlisp, formerly available only on large timesharing systems, now operates in the form of Interlisp- D on the Xerox 1100, 1108, and 1132 scientific information pro. cessors. The multiple window system provides reshaping, horizontal and vertical scrolling, and redisplaying. In addition to interactive graphics, Interlisp.D contains a display editor and inspector, programmer's assistant, debugging tools, and program analysis tools.)

Whereas a traditional database represents a person's name, for example, as a fixed-format sequence of characters, a symbol-processing computer represents the name as a symbol and can assign various properties to that symbol: first name John, birthdate 6/8/47, hair color blond, etc. These properties or relation

ships are not bound to the fixed formats of traditional databases, but are stored in a flexible manner. The symbol- processing computer can therefore accommodate new information without having to reprogram or r...