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A Comparative Study of Robot Languages

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131566D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-11
Document File: 19 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Susan Bonner: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Almost as many robot languages exist today as there are robots. What features can we recommend for an efficient RL of the future? Efficient communication with industrial robots is a key factor in the success of contemporary programmable automation, but robot languages -- the means of communication -- have commonly been developed in an ad hoc manner to meet the needs of a particular robot and application. Thus, we currently have almost as many robot languages as robots.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1982 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

A Comparative Study of Robot Languages

Susan Bonner Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Hang G. Shin University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Almost as many robot languages exist today as there are robots. What features can we recommend for an efficient RL of the future?

Efficient communication with industrial robots is a key factor in the success of contemporary programmable automation, but robot languages -- the means of communication -- have commonly been developed in an ad hoc manner to meet the needs of a particular robot and application. Thus, we currently have almost as many robot languages as robots.

To formulate recommendations for an efficient robot language of the future, this article reviews and evaluates many of the RLs now in use or under development in industrial or academic environments. Table I compares the industrial robots for which the languages were developed, and Table 2 contains background information on the 14 selected languages, ~ which are identified below.

(1) Funky. An IBM development, Funky is an advanced guiding system that produces robot programs through the use of manual guiding and a function keyboard. ~

(2) T3. The language provided with the T3 industrial robot manufactured by Cincinnati Milacron, T3 is a commercially available system that uses guided teaching and function buttons to program robot tasks.2~4

(3) Anorad. The Anomatic 1I Controller, commercially available from Anorad Corporation, provides a powerful numerical control language with programmable mathematical expressions, variables, jumps and subroutines, and a self- configuring capability.5

(4) Emily. Emily is an early attempt by IBM to develop a higher level, workhorse RL with a reasonably simple processor as an extension to their robot control language, ML.6

We acquired information on AML, a robot language developed and used by IBM, after preparation of this article. A powerful language with structured programmingcapability, AML is described in IBMRobot System/l, Vols, 1-3, IBM Corporation, Sept. 1981.

(5) RCL. Under development at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, RCL is a command-oriented motion control language to program a sequence of steps needed to accomplish a robot task.7

(6) RPL. A Fortran-like user language developed by SRI International, RPL is designed to facilitate the writing and debugging of application programs for material- handling, inspection, and assembly tasks.8~9

(7) Sigla. Available from Olivetti with their SuperSigma robot, Sigla uses only 8K of memory yet provides features such as parallel task contr...