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Calculating the Maximum Mean Data Rate in focal Area Networks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131605D
Original Publication Date: 1983-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-11
Document File: 7 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Bart W. Stuck: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In spring 1981, a subcommittee was formed to study network access methods given the same workload. Results show that carrier sense collision detection offers the shortest delay under light load. In February 1980 a group of people met in San Francisco to form Project 802: Local Area Network Standards, sponsored by the IEEE Computer Society. Since then, over 100 individuals from industry, government, and academia have participated in this effort. During 198O, however, the number of proposed methods and claims made it clear that no single standard for accessing a local area network would win a consensus. So a subcommittee was formed in spring 1981 to address one aspect of the project: for a given workload, what type of congestion might each proposed method experience? The subcommittee held two open meetings, each followed by circulation of a draft report for comment. All claims had to have enough evidence to allow independent verification. Such evidence included source code plus data for all simulation results, all numbers and formulas for analytic results, and complete experimental conditions and measurement procedures for data analysis on actual systems. (A 250-page draft reports of this subcommittee is available on request.)

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1983 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

Calculating the Maximum Mean Data Rate in focal Area Networks

Bart W. Stuck,

Bell Laboratories

In spring 1981, a subcommittee was formed to study network access methods given the same workload. Results show that carrier sense collision detection offers the shortest delay under light load.

In February 1980 a group of people met in San Francisco to form Project 802: Local Area Network Standards, sponsored by the IEEE Computer Society. Since then, over 100 individuals from industry, government, and academia have participated in this effort. During 198O, however, the number of proposed methods and claims made it clear that no single standard for accessing a local area network would win a consensus. So a subcommittee was formed in spring 1981 to address one aspect of the project: for a given workload, what type of congestion might each proposed method experience?

The subcommittee held two open meetings, each followed by circulation of a draft report for comment. All claims had to have enough evidence to allow independent verification. Such evidence included source code plus data for all simulation results, all numbers and formulas for analytic results, and complete experimental conditions and measurement procedures for data analysis on actual systems. (A 250-page draft reports of this subcommittee is available on request.)

This article summarizes the subcommittee's fqcus on calculating the maximum mean data rated

Traffic analysis

A local area network uses its transmission medium for two purposes: to control access to the medium and to transmit data. Any local area network has two regimes of operation: a region of low delay, where the stations attached to the local area network are a bottleneck (the sta tions cannot generate enough messages to congest the network), and a rein of high delay,-where the network is a bottleneck compared with the low delay regime; more time is spent in controlling access to the network and less in actual data transmission.

To say anything about the traffic-handling characteristics of a local area network, we need to know the message arrival awl length statistics and the access method.

Message arrival statistics include the following: How often does each station submit a message? Does a mean interarrival time adequately characterize the activity of each station, or are theme significant fluctuations and correlations about the mean? Are messages routed from station to station, or broadcast from one station to many?

Message length statistics include the following: How many bits per message? Is...